Az avian nephritis vírus okozta kórkép elofordulásának elso hazai leírása és elterjedtségének vizsgálata

Translated title of the contribution: First description and distribution of the avian nephritis infection in Hungary

Mándoki Míra, M. Dobos-Kovács, E. Ivánics, Nemes Csaba, T. Bakonyi, M. Rusvai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors describe the occurrence of an infectious chicken disease, avian nephritis for the first time in Hungary, which was suspected to be present from the early '70s, but the evidence was provided by a recently developed PCR based diagnostic method. The infectious nephritis is a component of the so called "baby chick nephropathy", referring to the localization and early appearance of the symptoms. The chickens from the third day after hatching develop diarrhea and weakness following per- oral infection: retarded growth is observed from the second week post infection. The mortality is usually low, except those cases where the tubular epithelium of the kidney is damaged due to the virus replication, nephroso-nephritis develops and the regressive changes result in uricosis (gout). The loss of the disease may be decreased or prevented if predisposing factors (such as keeping problems or malnutrition) are recognized and eliminated. In order to detect avian nephritis virus (ANV), kidney samples from chickens suffering acute nephritis and gout diagnosed by necropsy were subjected to histopathologic examination, and subsequently by RNA extraction/purification and polymerase chain reaction following reverse transcription (RT-PCR). A fast and reliable ANV specific RT-PCR based detection method was developed to identify the virus. Using this test the authors proved the presence of the avian nephritis virus in several Hungarian flocks and the results of the screening helped to clarify the occurrence of this viral disease. According to their data the infection is widely distributed in the Hungarian flocks, and avian nephritis virus infection might more often be the reason for the improper breeding results in chicken industry, than diagnosed.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)720-726
Number of pages7
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume127
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Avastrovirus
Avian nephritis virus
nephritis
Hungary
Nephritis
Chickens
gout
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Gout
reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction
Virus Diseases
chickens
Infection
infection
flocks
kidneys
Kidney
poultry diseases
Virus Replication
virus replication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Az avian nephritis v{\'i}rus okozta k{\'o}rk{\'e}p elofordul{\'a}s{\'a}nak elso hazai le{\'i}r{\'a}sa {\'e}s elterjedts{\'e}g{\'e}nek vizsg{\'a}lata",
abstract = "The authors describe the occurrence of an infectious chicken disease, avian nephritis for the first time in Hungary, which was suspected to be present from the early '70s, but the evidence was provided by a recently developed PCR based diagnostic method. The infectious nephritis is a component of the so called {"}baby chick nephropathy{"}, referring to the localization and early appearance of the symptoms. The chickens from the third day after hatching develop diarrhea and weakness following per- oral infection: retarded growth is observed from the second week post infection. The mortality is usually low, except those cases where the tubular epithelium of the kidney is damaged due to the virus replication, nephroso-nephritis develops and the regressive changes result in uricosis (gout). The loss of the disease may be decreased or prevented if predisposing factors (such as keeping problems or malnutrition) are recognized and eliminated. In order to detect avian nephritis virus (ANV), kidney samples from chickens suffering acute nephritis and gout diagnosed by necropsy were subjected to histopathologic examination, and subsequently by RNA extraction/purification and polymerase chain reaction following reverse transcription (RT-PCR). A fast and reliable ANV specific RT-PCR based detection method was developed to identify the virus. Using this test the authors proved the presence of the avian nephritis virus in several Hungarian flocks and the results of the screening helped to clarify the occurrence of this viral disease. According to their data the infection is widely distributed in the Hungarian flocks, and avian nephritis virus infection might more often be the reason for the improper breeding results in chicken industry, than diagnosed.",
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AU - Ivánics, E.

AU - Csaba, Nemes

AU - Bakonyi, T.

AU - Rusvai, M.

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