Kutyák elso autochton Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) fertozottsége Magyarországon: Esetleírás és az e kullancsfajjal kapcsolatos ismeretek áttekintése

Translated title of the contribution: First autochthonous infestation of dogs with Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Hungary: Case report and review of current knowledge on this tick species

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rhipicephalus sanguineus (the brown dog tick, kennel tick) has a world-wide geographical distribution. In Europe its original habitat is the Mediterranian basin, with sporadic introduction to northern countries. It is a three-host tick species, the dog being the primary host for all three developmental stages, but occasionally these can also attach to other mammals, even humans. This hard tick species is known for its capability to survive indoors, in houses. The authors review the geographical distribution, life-cycle, and significance of R. sanguineus as a vector that can transmit numerous pathogens. In August 2005, in North Hungary (Nógrád county, Zsunypuszta) on a beef cattle farm five engorged hard ticks were removed from the eyelids of a 2 year old, short-haired mixed breed male dog. Upon morphological examination all turned out to be nymphs of R. sanguineus. Sixteen days later a further engorged nymph was found on the same animal. To examine the presence of some important pathogens transmitted by this tick species, blood smears and serum samples of the dog were analysed, but they did not contain babesia developmental stages, or specific antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and Coxiella burnetii, respectively. Five further dogs were examined in the neighbourhood and were found tick-free. Extensive tick collection (by dragging/flagging) in four nearby forests revealed only 3 nymphs of Ixodes ricinus. However, 6 days later another dog became infested with R. sanguineus on the same farm. Both infested dogs were herding local cattle throughout their lives and neither the owners nor the dogs ever left the area (especially the country). The most likely introduction of these ticks in a younger stage (e.g. eggs in a fertilized female) was by a truck coming from Croatia to transport calves 40 days before the infestation was first detected.

Translated title of the contributionFirst autochthonous infestation of dogs with Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Hungary: Case report and review of current knowledge on this tick species
Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)623-629
Number of pages7
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume127
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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