Feeding-unrelated factors influencing the plasma leptin level in ruminants

M. Kulcsár, S. Jánosi, T. Lehtolainen, L. Kátai, C. Delavaud, O. Balogh, Y. Chilliard, S. Pyörälä, P. Rudas, G. Huszenicza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The triglyceride content of lipid depots associated with the current feeding level is the primary determinant of leptin gene expression and the circulating leptin level. In laboratory rodents and primates the plasma leptin is influenced also by the age, gender and physiological status (puberty, pregnancy, lactation, postpartum period), and by the health condition such as sepsis due to Gram-negative (GN) bacteria. Some pathologic conditions with intensive cytokine release evoke an increase in plasma leptin, which is thought to depress the subsequent feed intake. However, the effect of these secondary factors may be species-dependent, with still unknown clinical relevance in ruminants. In our ovine and bovine models plasma leptin increased after castration and dexamethasone treatment, decreased after experimental administration of synthetic androgens in castrated rams, but remained unchanged throughout the ovarian cycle and after ovariectomy. The circulating leptin level increased temporarily during synthetic progestin (fluorogestone) treatment in ewes, but similar changes were not seen in progesterone-supplemented ewes and norgestomet-treated cows. In a second trial on dairy cows we wanted to study whether elevated plasma leptin levels are induced by experimental endotoxin mastitis, or by natural outbreak of GN mastitis and puerperal metritis. Experimental endotoxin mastitis resulted in some-hour elevation in cortisol and insulin, with a simultaneous decrease in IGF-I and thyroid hormones. In the first 14 days of lactation GN mastitis induced the same endocrine alterations as the experimental endotoxin challenge, but in natural cases these changes varied within a wider range, and were more protracted and robust. Cows with puerperal metritis had more obvious catabolic changes in the early weeks of lactation, than their healthy counterparts. However, both mastitis and puerperal metritis failed to increase the circulating leptin level, showing that in cows the plasma leptin is not responsible for the anorexia associated with these inflammatory diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-226
Number of pages13
JournalDomestic Animal Endocrinology
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

Fingerprint

Ruminants
Leptin
leptin
ruminants
Mastitis
mastitis
endometritis
endotoxins
Lactation
Endotoxins
cows
ewes
synthetic androgens
lactation
Testosterone Congeners
synthetic progestogens
Progesterone Congeners
norgestomet
sepsis (infection)
ovariectomy

Keywords

  • Leptin
  • Mastitis
  • Puerperal metritis
  • Ruminants
  • Steroid hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Feeding-unrelated factors influencing the plasma leptin level in ruminants. / Kulcsár, M.; Jánosi, S.; Lehtolainen, T.; Kátai, L.; Delavaud, C.; Balogh, O.; Chilliard, Y.; Pyörälä, S.; Rudas, P.; Huszenicza, G.

In: Domestic Animal Endocrinology, Vol. 29, No. 1, 07.2005, p. 214-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kulcsár, M. ; Jánosi, S. ; Lehtolainen, T. ; Kátai, L. ; Delavaud, C. ; Balogh, O. ; Chilliard, Y. ; Pyörälä, S. ; Rudas, P. ; Huszenicza, G. / Feeding-unrelated factors influencing the plasma leptin level in ruminants. In: Domestic Animal Endocrinology. 2005 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 214-226.
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