Feeding premature infants with human milk or preterm milk formula: Effects on postnatal growth and on circulating concentrations of intermediary metabolites, amino acids, and regulatory peptides

S. A. Calvert, G. Soltesz, P. A. Jenkins, D. Harris, C. Newman, T. E. Adrian, S. R. Bloom, A. Aynsley-Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Results of a comprehensive longitudinal study comparing the effects of feeding healthy preterm infants with human milk or a specially adapted formula designed for the preterm infant are reported. 10 healthy infants were given human milk from birth, and 9 similar infants were given a formula which contained 80 kcal. 1.8 g protein, and 4.5 g fat per 100 ml. Anthropometric measurements were made weekly as were routine haematological and biochemical variables together with plasma amino acid and gastrointestinal regulatory peptide levels and metabolic fuel concentrations. Infants receiving the formula demonstrated a significantly greater growth velocity compared with infants receiving human milk. There were no significant differences between the two groups in routine haematological or biochemical variables measured nor in plasma insulin or blood glucose, lactate, pyruvate, or ketone body concentrations. Plasma amino acid profiles, however, did demonstrate some significant differences between the two groups with higher methionine and threonine levels in the formula-fed infants. Plasma motilin. enteroglucagon, neurotensin, cholecystokinin. gastric inhibiting polypeptide, and pancreatic polypeptide levels all demonstrated significant postnatal surges, with significant differences between the two groups in plasma gastric inhibiting polypeptide and pancreatic polypeptide concentrations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-198
Number of pages10
JournalNeonatology
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1985

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Growth
  • Human milk
  • Intermediary metabolism
  • Milk formula
  • Nutrition
  • Preterm infants
  • Regulatory peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Biology

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