Familiarity with images affects how dogs ( Canis familiaris) process life-size video projections of humans

P. Pongrácz, András Péter, A. Miklósi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A central problem of behavioural studies providing artificial visual stimuli for non-human animals is to determine how subjects perceive and process these stimuli. Especially in the case of videos, it is important to ascertain that animals perceive the actual content of the images and are not just reacting to the motion cues in the presentation. In this study, we set out to investigate how dogs process life-sized videos. We aimed to find out whether dogs perceive the actual content of video images or whether they only react to the videos as a set of dynamic visual elements. For this purpose, dogs were presented with an object search task where a life-sized projected human was hiding a target object. The videos were either normally oriented or displayed upside down, and we analysed dogs' reactions towards the projector screen after the video presentations, and their performance in the search task. Results indicated that in the case of the normally oriented videos, dogs spontaneously perceived the actual content of the images. However, the 'Inverted' videos were first processed as a set of unrelated visual elements, and only after some exposure to these videos did the dogs show signs of perceiving the unusual configuration of the depicted scene. Our most important conclusion was that dogs process the same type of artificial visual stimuli in different ways, depending on the familiarity of the depicted scene, and that the processing mode can change with exposure to unfamiliar stimuli.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1457-1468
Number of pages12
JournalQuarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)
Volume71
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Dogs
Recognition (Psychology)
Cues

Keywords

  • Dog
  • human
  • processing mode
  • visual stimuli

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{107c4fe00d2a4b438a253738b40f78c3,
title = "Familiarity with images affects how dogs ( Canis familiaris) process life-size video projections of humans",
abstract = "A central problem of behavioural studies providing artificial visual stimuli for non-human animals is to determine how subjects perceive and process these stimuli. Especially in the case of videos, it is important to ascertain that animals perceive the actual content of the images and are not just reacting to the motion cues in the presentation. In this study, we set out to investigate how dogs process life-sized videos. We aimed to find out whether dogs perceive the actual content of video images or whether they only react to the videos as a set of dynamic visual elements. For this purpose, dogs were presented with an object search task where a life-sized projected human was hiding a target object. The videos were either normally oriented or displayed upside down, and we analysed dogs' reactions towards the projector screen after the video presentations, and their performance in the search task. Results indicated that in the case of the normally oriented videos, dogs spontaneously perceived the actual content of the images. However, the 'Inverted' videos were first processed as a set of unrelated visual elements, and only after some exposure to these videos did the dogs show signs of perceiving the unusual configuration of the depicted scene. Our most important conclusion was that dogs process the same type of artificial visual stimuli in different ways, depending on the familiarity of the depicted scene, and that the processing mode can change with exposure to unfamiliar stimuli.",
keywords = "Dog, human, processing mode, visual stimuli",
author = "P. Pongr{\'a}cz and Andr{\'a}s P{\'e}ter and A. Mikl{\'o}si",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/17470218.2017.1333623",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "1457--1468",
journal = "Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology",
issn = "1747-0218",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Familiarity with images affects how dogs ( Canis familiaris) process life-size video projections of humans

AU - Pongrácz, P.

AU - Péter, András

AU - Miklósi, A.

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - A central problem of behavioural studies providing artificial visual stimuli for non-human animals is to determine how subjects perceive and process these stimuli. Especially in the case of videos, it is important to ascertain that animals perceive the actual content of the images and are not just reacting to the motion cues in the presentation. In this study, we set out to investigate how dogs process life-sized videos. We aimed to find out whether dogs perceive the actual content of video images or whether they only react to the videos as a set of dynamic visual elements. For this purpose, dogs were presented with an object search task where a life-sized projected human was hiding a target object. The videos were either normally oriented or displayed upside down, and we analysed dogs' reactions towards the projector screen after the video presentations, and their performance in the search task. Results indicated that in the case of the normally oriented videos, dogs spontaneously perceived the actual content of the images. However, the 'Inverted' videos were first processed as a set of unrelated visual elements, and only after some exposure to these videos did the dogs show signs of perceiving the unusual configuration of the depicted scene. Our most important conclusion was that dogs process the same type of artificial visual stimuli in different ways, depending on the familiarity of the depicted scene, and that the processing mode can change with exposure to unfamiliar stimuli.

AB - A central problem of behavioural studies providing artificial visual stimuli for non-human animals is to determine how subjects perceive and process these stimuli. Especially in the case of videos, it is important to ascertain that animals perceive the actual content of the images and are not just reacting to the motion cues in the presentation. In this study, we set out to investigate how dogs process life-sized videos. We aimed to find out whether dogs perceive the actual content of video images or whether they only react to the videos as a set of dynamic visual elements. For this purpose, dogs were presented with an object search task where a life-sized projected human was hiding a target object. The videos were either normally oriented or displayed upside down, and we analysed dogs' reactions towards the projector screen after the video presentations, and their performance in the search task. Results indicated that in the case of the normally oriented videos, dogs spontaneously perceived the actual content of the images. However, the 'Inverted' videos were first processed as a set of unrelated visual elements, and only after some exposure to these videos did the dogs show signs of perceiving the unusual configuration of the depicted scene. Our most important conclusion was that dogs process the same type of artificial visual stimuli in different ways, depending on the familiarity of the depicted scene, and that the processing mode can change with exposure to unfamiliar stimuli.

KW - Dog

KW - human

KW - processing mode

KW - visual stimuli

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053715569&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053715569&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1333623

DO - 10.1080/17470218.2017.1333623

M3 - Article

C2 - 28532292

AN - SCOPUS:85053715569

VL - 71

SP - 1457

EP - 1468

JO - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

JF - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

SN - 1747-0218

IS - 6

ER -