Failure to differentiate Cryptosporidium parvum from C. meleagridis based on PCR amplification of eight DNA sequences

Dominique Champliaud, Philippe Gobet, Muriel Naciri, Odile Vagner, José Lopez, Jean Christophe Buisson, Istvan Varga, Geraldine Harly, Roseline Mancassola, Alain Bonnin

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Abstract

In order to determine the specificities of PCR-based assays used for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum DNA, eight pairs of previously described PCR primers targeting six distinct regions of the Cryptosporidium genome were evaluated for the detection of C. parvum, the agent of human cryptosporidiosis, and C. muris, C. baileyi, and C. meleagridis, three Cryptosporidium species that infect birds or mammals but are not considered to be human pathogens. The four Cryptosporidium species were divided into two groups: C. parvum and C. meleagridis, which gave the same-sized fragments with all the reactions, and C. muris and C. baileyi, which gave positive results with primer pairs targeting the 18S rRNA gene only. In addition to being genetically similar at each of the eight loci analyzed by DNA amplification, C. parvum and C. meleagridis couldn't be differentiated even after restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR products obtained from three of the target genes. This study indicates that caution should be exercised in the interpretation of data from water sample analysis performed by these methods, since a positive result does not necessarily reflect a contamination by the human pathogen C. parvum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1454-1458
Number of pages5
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume64
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1998

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Champliaud, D., Gobet, P., Naciri, M., Vagner, O., Lopez, J., Buisson, J. C., Varga, I., Harly, G., Mancassola, R., & Bonnin, A. (1998). Failure to differentiate Cryptosporidium parvum from C. meleagridis based on PCR amplification of eight DNA sequences. Applied and environmental microbiology, 64(4), 1454-1458.