Factors affecting mummification and sporulation of pome fruit infected by Monilinia fructigena in Dutch orchards

G. C M Van Leeuwen, I. Holb, M. J. Jeger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 2-year field experiment (1997-98, 1998-99) was conducted to study mummification and subsequent sporulation in spring of apple (cvs James Grieve, Golden Delicious) and pear (cv. Conference) fruits infected by Monilinia fructigena. Most mummified fruits were found in James Grieve and Conference, whereas in late-infected Golden Delicious, fruits were still soft when examined in April. In the first year, these late-infected fruits had a significantly higher sporulation intensity per sporulating fruit (P = 0.05) compared with Golden Delicious fruits infected 9 and 5 weeks before harvest maturity, which were partly mummified. It was concluded that early- and late-infected fruits contributed to primary inoculum in the next season. In a postinfection regime of 25°C and 65-75% relative humidity under controlled conditions, the number of Conference fruits sporulating decreased rapidly, and after 12 weeks' incubation sporulation had completely ceased. After 8 weeks' incubation, sporulation intensity in the postinfection regime at 10°C was significantly higher than that at 20 and 25°C in a first experiment with inoculated unripe fruit (P = 0.05). Results of a second experiment with ripe fruit were less clear. These results are discussed in relation to orchard disease management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)787-793
Number of pages7
JournalPlant Pathology
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Monilinia fructigena
pome fruits
sporulation
Fruit
orchards
fruits
Pyrus
Malus
Disease Management
Humidity
pears
relative humidity
inoculum
disease control

Keywords

  • Brown rot fungi
  • Disease management
  • Monilinia fructigena
  • Pome fruits
  • Primary inoculum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Factors affecting mummification and sporulation of pome fruit infected by Monilinia fructigena in Dutch orchards. / Van Leeuwen, G. C M; Holb, I.; Jeger, M. J.

In: Plant Pathology, Vol. 51, No. 6, 12.2002, p. 787-793.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a361324199d4424981726e952a344300,
title = "Factors affecting mummification and sporulation of pome fruit infected by Monilinia fructigena in Dutch orchards",
abstract = "A 2-year field experiment (1997-98, 1998-99) was conducted to study mummification and subsequent sporulation in spring of apple (cvs James Grieve, Golden Delicious) and pear (cv. Conference) fruits infected by Monilinia fructigena. Most mummified fruits were found in James Grieve and Conference, whereas in late-infected Golden Delicious, fruits were still soft when examined in April. In the first year, these late-infected fruits had a significantly higher sporulation intensity per sporulating fruit (P = 0.05) compared with Golden Delicious fruits infected 9 and 5 weeks before harvest maturity, which were partly mummified. It was concluded that early- and late-infected fruits contributed to primary inoculum in the next season. In a postinfection regime of 25°C and 65-75{\%} relative humidity under controlled conditions, the number of Conference fruits sporulating decreased rapidly, and after 12 weeks' incubation sporulation had completely ceased. After 8 weeks' incubation, sporulation intensity in the postinfection regime at 10°C was significantly higher than that at 20 and 25°C in a first experiment with inoculated unripe fruit (P = 0.05). Results of a second experiment with ripe fruit were less clear. These results are discussed in relation to orchard disease management.",
keywords = "Brown rot fungi, Disease management, Monilinia fructigena, Pome fruits, Primary inoculum",
author = "{Van Leeuwen}, {G. C M} and I. Holb and Jeger, {M. J.}",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1046/j.1365-3059.2002.00789.x",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "787--793",
journal = "Plant Pathology",
issn = "0032-0862",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors affecting mummification and sporulation of pome fruit infected by Monilinia fructigena in Dutch orchards

AU - Van Leeuwen, G. C M

AU - Holb, I.

AU - Jeger, M. J.

PY - 2002/12

Y1 - 2002/12

N2 - A 2-year field experiment (1997-98, 1998-99) was conducted to study mummification and subsequent sporulation in spring of apple (cvs James Grieve, Golden Delicious) and pear (cv. Conference) fruits infected by Monilinia fructigena. Most mummified fruits were found in James Grieve and Conference, whereas in late-infected Golden Delicious, fruits were still soft when examined in April. In the first year, these late-infected fruits had a significantly higher sporulation intensity per sporulating fruit (P = 0.05) compared with Golden Delicious fruits infected 9 and 5 weeks before harvest maturity, which were partly mummified. It was concluded that early- and late-infected fruits contributed to primary inoculum in the next season. In a postinfection regime of 25°C and 65-75% relative humidity under controlled conditions, the number of Conference fruits sporulating decreased rapidly, and after 12 weeks' incubation sporulation had completely ceased. After 8 weeks' incubation, sporulation intensity in the postinfection regime at 10°C was significantly higher than that at 20 and 25°C in a first experiment with inoculated unripe fruit (P = 0.05). Results of a second experiment with ripe fruit were less clear. These results are discussed in relation to orchard disease management.

AB - A 2-year field experiment (1997-98, 1998-99) was conducted to study mummification and subsequent sporulation in spring of apple (cvs James Grieve, Golden Delicious) and pear (cv. Conference) fruits infected by Monilinia fructigena. Most mummified fruits were found in James Grieve and Conference, whereas in late-infected Golden Delicious, fruits were still soft when examined in April. In the first year, these late-infected fruits had a significantly higher sporulation intensity per sporulating fruit (P = 0.05) compared with Golden Delicious fruits infected 9 and 5 weeks before harvest maturity, which were partly mummified. It was concluded that early- and late-infected fruits contributed to primary inoculum in the next season. In a postinfection regime of 25°C and 65-75% relative humidity under controlled conditions, the number of Conference fruits sporulating decreased rapidly, and after 12 weeks' incubation sporulation had completely ceased. After 8 weeks' incubation, sporulation intensity in the postinfection regime at 10°C was significantly higher than that at 20 and 25°C in a first experiment with inoculated unripe fruit (P = 0.05). Results of a second experiment with ripe fruit were less clear. These results are discussed in relation to orchard disease management.

KW - Brown rot fungi

KW - Disease management

KW - Monilinia fructigena

KW - Pome fruits

KW - Primary inoculum

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036914661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036914661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1046/j.1365-3059.2002.00789.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1365-3059.2002.00789.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0036914661

VL - 51

SP - 787

EP - 793

JO - Plant Pathology

JF - Plant Pathology

SN - 0032-0862

IS - 6

ER -