Experiments with artificial nests on predation in reed habitats

P. Batáry, Hans Winkler, A. Báldi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We performed nest predation experiments with artificial nests in reedbeds investigating whether nest predation pressure is different at the water-reed edge and the grassland-reed edge compared with the reed interior. Furthermore, we tested the effects of vegetation structure (reed density, height and thickness) and the effect of other nest site characteristics (distance from edge, water depth) on the success of artificial nests. The experiments were completed 3 times during the breeding season in 2001 at Lake Neusiedl, Austria. Each artificial nest resembled Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) nests and contained one plasticine and one Quail (Coturnix coturnix) egg and the predators were identified by marks left on the eggs. The potential predators were birds, probably the Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus), gulls (Larus spp.) and reed warblers (Acrocephalus spp.). Nest survival data were analysed using the Mayfield method, and we performed a discriminant analysis for the data of vegetation and nest site characteristics. The nest predation was higher at the edges than in the reed interior, and was most pronounced in April, before the new reed sprouted. The reason for this finding was probably that after May the new reed contributed to greater concealment of the nests through the higher reed density and height.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-63
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Ornithology
Volume145
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2004

Fingerprint

nests
predation
habitats
nesting sites
Coturnix coturnix
predators
Circus
Larus
vegetation structure
quails
Laridae
Austria
discriminant analysis
breeding season
water
grasslands
lakes
vegetation
birds

Keywords

  • Concealment
  • Edge effect
  • Mayfield method
  • Nest side
  • Vegetation structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Experiments with artificial nests on predation in reed habitats. / Batáry, P.; Winkler, Hans; Báldi, A.

In: Journal of Ornithology, Vol. 145, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 59-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e178afcdd5c6473aac4a289a1231be48,
title = "Experiments with artificial nests on predation in reed habitats",
abstract = "We performed nest predation experiments with artificial nests in reedbeds investigating whether nest predation pressure is different at the water-reed edge and the grassland-reed edge compared with the reed interior. Furthermore, we tested the effects of vegetation structure (reed density, height and thickness) and the effect of other nest site characteristics (distance from edge, water depth) on the success of artificial nests. The experiments were completed 3 times during the breeding season in 2001 at Lake Neusiedl, Austria. Each artificial nest resembled Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) nests and contained one plasticine and one Quail (Coturnix coturnix) egg and the predators were identified by marks left on the eggs. The potential predators were birds, probably the Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus), gulls (Larus spp.) and reed warblers (Acrocephalus spp.). Nest survival data were analysed using the Mayfield method, and we performed a discriminant analysis for the data of vegetation and nest site characteristics. The nest predation was higher at the edges than in the reed interior, and was most pronounced in April, before the new reed sprouted. The reason for this finding was probably that after May the new reed contributed to greater concealment of the nests through the higher reed density and height.",
keywords = "Concealment, Edge effect, Mayfield method, Nest side, Vegetation structure",
author = "P. Bat{\'a}ry and Hans Winkler and A. B{\'a}ldi",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10336-003-0010-9",
language = "English",
volume = "145",
pages = "59--63",
journal = "Journal fur Ornithologie",
issn = "2193-7206",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experiments with artificial nests on predation in reed habitats

AU - Batáry, P.

AU - Winkler, Hans

AU - Báldi, A.

PY - 2004/1

Y1 - 2004/1

N2 - We performed nest predation experiments with artificial nests in reedbeds investigating whether nest predation pressure is different at the water-reed edge and the grassland-reed edge compared with the reed interior. Furthermore, we tested the effects of vegetation structure (reed density, height and thickness) and the effect of other nest site characteristics (distance from edge, water depth) on the success of artificial nests. The experiments were completed 3 times during the breeding season in 2001 at Lake Neusiedl, Austria. Each artificial nest resembled Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) nests and contained one plasticine and one Quail (Coturnix coturnix) egg and the predators were identified by marks left on the eggs. The potential predators were birds, probably the Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus), gulls (Larus spp.) and reed warblers (Acrocephalus spp.). Nest survival data were analysed using the Mayfield method, and we performed a discriminant analysis for the data of vegetation and nest site characteristics. The nest predation was higher at the edges than in the reed interior, and was most pronounced in April, before the new reed sprouted. The reason for this finding was probably that after May the new reed contributed to greater concealment of the nests through the higher reed density and height.

AB - We performed nest predation experiments with artificial nests in reedbeds investigating whether nest predation pressure is different at the water-reed edge and the grassland-reed edge compared with the reed interior. Furthermore, we tested the effects of vegetation structure (reed density, height and thickness) and the effect of other nest site characteristics (distance from edge, water depth) on the success of artificial nests. The experiments were completed 3 times during the breeding season in 2001 at Lake Neusiedl, Austria. Each artificial nest resembled Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) nests and contained one plasticine and one Quail (Coturnix coturnix) egg and the predators were identified by marks left on the eggs. The potential predators were birds, probably the Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus), gulls (Larus spp.) and reed warblers (Acrocephalus spp.). Nest survival data were analysed using the Mayfield method, and we performed a discriminant analysis for the data of vegetation and nest site characteristics. The nest predation was higher at the edges than in the reed interior, and was most pronounced in April, before the new reed sprouted. The reason for this finding was probably that after May the new reed contributed to greater concealment of the nests through the higher reed density and height.

KW - Concealment

KW - Edge effect

KW - Mayfield method

KW - Nest side

KW - Vegetation structure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1842670068&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1842670068&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10336-003-0010-9

DO - 10.1007/s10336-003-0010-9

M3 - Article

VL - 145

SP - 59

EP - 63

JO - Journal fur Ornithologie

JF - Journal fur Ornithologie

SN - 2193-7206

IS - 1

ER -