Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models

Amin Al-Awar, Krisztina Kupai, Médea Veszelka, Gergo Szucs, Zouhair Attieh, Zsolt Murlasits, Szilvia Török, Anikó Pósa, Csaba Varga

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9051426
JournalJournal of Diabetes Research
Volume2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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    Al-Awar, A., Kupai, K., Veszelka, M., Szucs, G., Attieh, Z., Murlasits, Z., Török, S., Pósa, A., & Varga, C. (2016). Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models. Journal of Diabetes Research, 2016, [9051426]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/9051426