Experiences with the application of the DRG principle in Hungary

Júlia Nagy, Csaba Dózsa, I. Boncz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A brief description of the Hungarian health care system With the political changes in 1990, the Hungarian health care system changed from a Soviet-type health care system to the Bismarckian traditions of compulsory national health insurance similar to many other East European countries. After 1990, the responsibility for maintaining all levels of health care services was transferred from central to local government with a few exceptions (universities, national medical institutes). Responsibility for the financing of health care services was given to the National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF), the only insurance fund in Hungary, and performance-related financing was introduced. As a general rule, NHIF finances the running costs, while coverage of capital costs is the duty of the owner of the health care institute, usually local government. Most of the health care budget comes from contributions. Employees pay a contribution of 4 per cent of their gross income, and employers pay 11 per cent, without an income ceiling. In 1996 a “health tax” was introduced, which was a fixed, lump sum amount (currently 3,450 Ft/month/employee (approx. US$18.50); average income in Hungary is about US$600/month). This health tax is expected to be eliminated in the future. Although currently only about 38 per cent of the total Hungarian population pay health insurance contributions, the rest (pensioners, children, the unemployed, etc.) also receive health insurance coverage and are entitled to health care services.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Globalization of Managerial Innovation in Health Care
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages284-319
Number of pages36
ISBN (Print)9780511620003, 9780521885003
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Income
National health insurance
Hungary
Health care services
Health care system
Tax
Healthcare
Employees
Financing
Health
Local government
Responsibility
Health insurance
Cost of capital
Employers
Finance
Political change
Owners
Insurance
European countries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Nagy, J., Dózsa, C., & Boncz, I. (2008). Experiences with the application of the DRG principle in Hungary. In The Globalization of Managerial Innovation in Health Care (pp. 284-319). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511620003.015

Experiences with the application of the DRG principle in Hungary. / Nagy, Júlia; Dózsa, Csaba; Boncz, I.

The Globalization of Managerial Innovation in Health Care. Cambridge University Press, 2008. p. 284-319.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Nagy, J, Dózsa, C & Boncz, I 2008, Experiences with the application of the DRG principle in Hungary. in The Globalization of Managerial Innovation in Health Care. Cambridge University Press, pp. 284-319. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511620003.015
Nagy J, Dózsa C, Boncz I. Experiences with the application of the DRG principle in Hungary. In The Globalization of Managerial Innovation in Health Care. Cambridge University Press. 2008. p. 284-319 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511620003.015
Nagy, Júlia ; Dózsa, Csaba ; Boncz, I. / Experiences with the application of the DRG principle in Hungary. The Globalization of Managerial Innovation in Health Care. Cambridge University Press, 2008. pp. 284-319
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