Testedzésfüggoség: a sportolás mint addikció.

Translated title of the contribution: Exercise addiction: a literature review

Z. Demetrovics, Tamás Kurimay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exercise in appropriate quantity and of proper quality contributes significantly to the preserve our health. On the contrary, excessive exercise may be harmful to health. The term 'exercise addiction' has been gaining increasing recognition to describe the latter phenomenon. The exact definition of exercise addiction and its potential associations with other disorders is still under study, although according to the authors this phenomenon can be primarily described as a behavioral addiction. Accordingly, exercise addiction, among other behavioral and mental disorders, can be well describe within the obsessive-compulsive spectrum suggested by Hollander (1993). There are several tools used to assess exercise addiction. The authors here present the Hungarian version of the Exercise Dependence Scale (Hausenblas és Downs, 2002) and the Exercise Addiction Inventory (Terry, Szabo és Griffiths, 2004). Exercise addiction has many symptoms in common and also shows a high comorbidity with eating disorders and body image disorders. It may be more closely associated with certain sports but more data is needed to demonstrate this specificity with more certainty. Sel-evaluation problems seem to have a central role in the etiology from a psychological aspect. The relevance of neurohormonal mechanisms is less clear. The authors emphasize the importance of further research on exercise addiction. One important question to be answered is if this disorder is an independent entity to be classified as a distinct clinical disorder or is it rather a subgroup of another disorder.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)129-141
Number of pages13
JournalPsychiatria Hungarica : A Magyar Pszichiátriai Társaság tudományos folyóirata
Volume23
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Body Dysmorphic Disorders
Health
Mental Disorders
Sports
Comorbidity
Psychology
Equipment and Supplies
Research
Feeding and Eating Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Testedzésfüggoség : a sportolás mint addikció. / Demetrovics, Z.; Kurimay, Tamás.

In: Psychiatria Hungarica : A Magyar Pszichiátriai Társaság tudományos folyóirata, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2008, p. 129-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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