Exercise Addiction

Attila Szabo, Mark D. Griffiths, Z. Demetrovics

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The addictive aspect of exercise behavior is well known. The issue is controversial, because exercise, unlike tobacco smoking, drinking alcohol, or gambling, is viewed as a healthy behavior. Therefore, it is not surprising that high levels of commitment to exercise were connotated as "positive addiction." In fact, exercise addiction is a morbid pattern of uncontrolled exercise behavior resulting in harm to the affected individual. It is driven by strong urges and cravings for the behavior, which are also accompanied by severe withdrawal symptoms. Research into exercise addiction is based on self-reports yielding risk scores rather than diagnosis. The prevalence of exercise addiction is rare, ranging between 0.3% and 0.5% in the general population and 3.0% and 6.0% in the exercising population. There are several models for the morbidity, but many of them are incomplete. A more recent interactional model is presented to emphasize the subjective nature of the morbidity. It is stressed that a better understanding of the behavior may result from the inductive examination of idiographic clinical case studies rather than nomothetic research.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGeneral Processes and Mechanisms, Prescription Medications, Caffeine and Areca, Polydrug Misuse, Emerging Addictions and Non-Drug Addictions
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages984-992
Number of pages9
Volume3
ISBN (Electronic)9780128006771
ISBN (Print)9780128006344
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 13 2016

Keywords

  • Behavioral addiction
  • Compulsive exercise
  • Exercise addiction
  • Exercise dependence
  • Habitual exercise
  • Obligatory exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Szabo, A., Griffiths, M. D., & Demetrovics, Z. (2016). Exercise Addiction. In General Processes and Mechanisms, Prescription Medications, Caffeine and Areca, Polydrug Misuse, Emerging Addictions and Non-Drug Addictions (Vol. 3, pp. 984-992). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800634-4.00097-4