Exenatide induces aortic vasodilation increasing hydrogen sulphide, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide production

Eszter Sélley, Szilárd Kun, István A. Szijártó, Boglárka Laczy, Tibor Kovács, F. Fülöp, I. Wittmann, Gergo A. Molnár

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It has been reported that GLP-1 agonist exenatide (exendin-4) decreases blood pressure. The dose-dependent vasodilator effect of exendin-4 has previously been demonstrated, although the precise mechanism is not thoroughly described. Here we have aimed to provide in vitro evidence for the hypothesis that exenatide may decrease central (aortic) blood pressure involving three gasotransmitters, namely nitric oxide (NO) carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulphide (H2S).Methods: We determined the vasoactive effect of exenatide on isolated thoracic aortic rings of adult rats. Two millimetre-long vessel segments were placed in a wire myograph and preincubated with inhibitors of the enzymes producing the three gasotransmitters, with inhibitors of reactive oxygen species formation, prostaglandin synthesis, inhibitors of protein kinases, potassium channels or with an inhibitor of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger.Results: Exenatide caused dose-dependent relaxation of rat thoracic aorta, which was evoked via the GLP-1 receptor and was mediated mainly by H2S but also by NO and CO. Prostaglandins and superoxide free radical also play a part in the relaxation. Inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase significantly diminished vasorelaxation. We found that ATP-sensitive-, voltage-gated- and calcium-activated large-conductance potassium channels are also involved in the vasodilation, but that seemingly the inhibition of the KCNQ-type voltage-gated potassium channels resulted in the most remarkable decrease in the rate of vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger abolished most of the vasodilation.Conclusions: Exenatide induces vasodilation in rat thoracic aorta with the contribution of all three gasotransmitters. We provide in vitro evidence for the potential ability of exenatide to lower central (aortic) blood pressure, which could have relevant clinical importance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number69
JournalCardiovascular Diabetology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2 2014

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Hydrogen Sulfide
Carbon Monoxide
Vasodilation
Nitric Oxide
Gasotransmitters
Thoracic Aorta
Arterial Pressure
Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels
Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels
Prostaglandin Antagonists
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
exenatide
Potassium Channels
Enzyme Inhibitors
Vasodilator Agents
Superoxides
Protein Kinases
Free Radicals
Prostaglandins
Reactive Oxygen Species

Keywords

  • Aortic rings
  • Central blood pressure
  • Exenatide
  • Glucagon-like-peptide-1
  • Vasodilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Exenatide induces aortic vasodilation increasing hydrogen sulphide, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide production. / Sélley, Eszter; Kun, Szilárd; Szijártó, István A.; Laczy, Boglárka; Kovács, Tibor; Fülöp, F.; Wittmann, I.; Molnár, Gergo A.

In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, Vol. 13, No. 1, 69, 02.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sélley, Eszter ; Kun, Szilárd ; Szijártó, István A. ; Laczy, Boglárka ; Kovács, Tibor ; Fülöp, F. ; Wittmann, I. ; Molnár, Gergo A. / Exenatide induces aortic vasodilation increasing hydrogen sulphide, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide production. In: Cardiovascular Diabetology. 2014 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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AU - Kun, Szilárd

AU - Szijártó, István A.

AU - Laczy, Boglárka

AU - Kovács, Tibor

AU - Fülöp, F.

AU - Wittmann, I.

AU - Molnár, Gergo A.

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