Examination of protective effect of ischemic postconditioning after small bowel autotransplantation

A. Ferencz, I. Takcs, S. Horváth, S. Ferencz, S. Jávor, T. Fekecs, K. Shanava, B. Balatonyi, G. Wéber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a serious condition that results from some surgical procedures, including intestinal transplantation. Ischemic postconditioning is defined as brief periods of reperfusion alternating with reocclusion applied during the early minutes after reperfusion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ischemic postconditioning before small bowel autotransplantation. Total orthotopic intestinal autotransplantation was performed in 30 white domestic pigs. Grafts were stored in cold University of Wisconsin solution for 1, 3, or 6 hours. Duration of reperfusion was 3 hours in all grafts. Before reperfusion, the intestine was postconditioned via 3 cycles of ischemia for 30 seconds and reperfusion for 30 seconds (ischemic postconditioning protocol). Tissue from the small intestine was obtained after laparotomy (control group) and at the end of reperfusion periods. To monitor oxidative stress, tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione, and activity of superoxide dismutase were determined at spectrophotometry. Tissue damage on sections stained with hematoxylin- eosin was evaluated using a quantitative method (Scion Image software; Scion Corp, Frederick, Maryland). Our results demonstrated that ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased the reperfusion-ended lipid peroxidation value (mean ± SEM, 142.0 ± 7.1 μmol/g vs 125.0 ± 2.1 μmol/g; P <.05). Moreover, the capacity and activity of endogenous antioxidant protective systems (glutathione 789 ± 8.0 μmol/g vs 934 ± 5.7 μmol/g, and superoxide dismutase 110 ± 9 IU/g vs 126 ± 4 IU/g; P <.05) remained higher in the ischemic postconditioning groups compared with tissues without ischemic postconditioning. At quantitative analysis, tissue injury was increased by the duration of cold preservation. The greatest injury was observed in the mucosal and submucosal layers and in the depth of crypts after 6 hours of preservation. Ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased intestinal wall injury in each group (P <.05). It was concluded that ischemic postconditioning before reperfusion mitigated oxidative stress and histologic damage during small bowel autotransplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2287-2289
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

Ischemic Postconditioning
Autologous Transplantation
Reperfusion
Superoxide Dismutase
Glutathione
Wounds and Injuries
Oxidative Stress
Transplants
Sus scrofa
Spectrophotometry
Hematoxylin
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Reperfusion Injury
Malondialdehyde
Laparotomy
Lipid Peroxidation
Small Intestine
Intestines
Software
Ischemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Examination of protective effect of ischemic postconditioning after small bowel autotransplantation. / Ferencz, A.; Takcs, I.; Horváth, S.; Ferencz, S.; Jávor, S.; Fekecs, T.; Shanava, K.; Balatonyi, B.; Wéber, G.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 42, No. 6, 07.2010, p. 2287-2289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferencz, A. ; Takcs, I. ; Horváth, S. ; Ferencz, S. ; Jávor, S. ; Fekecs, T. ; Shanava, K. ; Balatonyi, B. ; Wéber, G. / Examination of protective effect of ischemic postconditioning after small bowel autotransplantation. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2010 ; Vol. 42, No. 6. pp. 2287-2289.
@article{78a1e187fa3f4d09aaa29713b004f612,
title = "Examination of protective effect of ischemic postconditioning after small bowel autotransplantation",
abstract = "Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a serious condition that results from some surgical procedures, including intestinal transplantation. Ischemic postconditioning is defined as brief periods of reperfusion alternating with reocclusion applied during the early minutes after reperfusion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ischemic postconditioning before small bowel autotransplantation. Total orthotopic intestinal autotransplantation was performed in 30 white domestic pigs. Grafts were stored in cold University of Wisconsin solution for 1, 3, or 6 hours. Duration of reperfusion was 3 hours in all grafts. Before reperfusion, the intestine was postconditioned via 3 cycles of ischemia for 30 seconds and reperfusion for 30 seconds (ischemic postconditioning protocol). Tissue from the small intestine was obtained after laparotomy (control group) and at the end of reperfusion periods. To monitor oxidative stress, tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione, and activity of superoxide dismutase were determined at spectrophotometry. Tissue damage on sections stained with hematoxylin- eosin was evaluated using a quantitative method (Scion Image software; Scion Corp, Frederick, Maryland). Our results demonstrated that ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased the reperfusion-ended lipid peroxidation value (mean ± SEM, 142.0 ± 7.1 μmol/g vs 125.0 ± 2.1 μmol/g; P <.05). Moreover, the capacity and activity of endogenous antioxidant protective systems (glutathione 789 ± 8.0 μmol/g vs 934 ± 5.7 μmol/g, and superoxide dismutase 110 ± 9 IU/g vs 126 ± 4 IU/g; P <.05) remained higher in the ischemic postconditioning groups compared with tissues without ischemic postconditioning. At quantitative analysis, tissue injury was increased by the duration of cold preservation. The greatest injury was observed in the mucosal and submucosal layers and in the depth of crypts after 6 hours of preservation. Ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased intestinal wall injury in each group (P <.05). It was concluded that ischemic postconditioning before reperfusion mitigated oxidative stress and histologic damage during small bowel autotransplantation.",
author = "A. Ferencz and I. Takcs and S. Horv{\'a}th and S. Ferencz and S. J{\'a}vor and T. Fekecs and K. Shanava and B. Balatonyi and G. W{\'e}ber",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.transproceed.2010.05.023",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "2287--2289",
journal = "Transplantation Proceedings",
issn = "0041-1345",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examination of protective effect of ischemic postconditioning after small bowel autotransplantation

AU - Ferencz, A.

AU - Takcs, I.

AU - Horváth, S.

AU - Ferencz, S.

AU - Jávor, S.

AU - Fekecs, T.

AU - Shanava, K.

AU - Balatonyi, B.

AU - Wéber, G.

PY - 2010/7

Y1 - 2010/7

N2 - Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a serious condition that results from some surgical procedures, including intestinal transplantation. Ischemic postconditioning is defined as brief periods of reperfusion alternating with reocclusion applied during the early minutes after reperfusion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ischemic postconditioning before small bowel autotransplantation. Total orthotopic intestinal autotransplantation was performed in 30 white domestic pigs. Grafts were stored in cold University of Wisconsin solution for 1, 3, or 6 hours. Duration of reperfusion was 3 hours in all grafts. Before reperfusion, the intestine was postconditioned via 3 cycles of ischemia for 30 seconds and reperfusion for 30 seconds (ischemic postconditioning protocol). Tissue from the small intestine was obtained after laparotomy (control group) and at the end of reperfusion periods. To monitor oxidative stress, tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione, and activity of superoxide dismutase were determined at spectrophotometry. Tissue damage on sections stained with hematoxylin- eosin was evaluated using a quantitative method (Scion Image software; Scion Corp, Frederick, Maryland). Our results demonstrated that ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased the reperfusion-ended lipid peroxidation value (mean ± SEM, 142.0 ± 7.1 μmol/g vs 125.0 ± 2.1 μmol/g; P <.05). Moreover, the capacity and activity of endogenous antioxidant protective systems (glutathione 789 ± 8.0 μmol/g vs 934 ± 5.7 μmol/g, and superoxide dismutase 110 ± 9 IU/g vs 126 ± 4 IU/g; P <.05) remained higher in the ischemic postconditioning groups compared with tissues without ischemic postconditioning. At quantitative analysis, tissue injury was increased by the duration of cold preservation. The greatest injury was observed in the mucosal and submucosal layers and in the depth of crypts after 6 hours of preservation. Ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased intestinal wall injury in each group (P <.05). It was concluded that ischemic postconditioning before reperfusion mitigated oxidative stress and histologic damage during small bowel autotransplantation.

AB - Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a serious condition that results from some surgical procedures, including intestinal transplantation. Ischemic postconditioning is defined as brief periods of reperfusion alternating with reocclusion applied during the early minutes after reperfusion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ischemic postconditioning before small bowel autotransplantation. Total orthotopic intestinal autotransplantation was performed in 30 white domestic pigs. Grafts were stored in cold University of Wisconsin solution for 1, 3, or 6 hours. Duration of reperfusion was 3 hours in all grafts. Before reperfusion, the intestine was postconditioned via 3 cycles of ischemia for 30 seconds and reperfusion for 30 seconds (ischemic postconditioning protocol). Tissue from the small intestine was obtained after laparotomy (control group) and at the end of reperfusion periods. To monitor oxidative stress, tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione, and activity of superoxide dismutase were determined at spectrophotometry. Tissue damage on sections stained with hematoxylin- eosin was evaluated using a quantitative method (Scion Image software; Scion Corp, Frederick, Maryland). Our results demonstrated that ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased the reperfusion-ended lipid peroxidation value (mean ± SEM, 142.0 ± 7.1 μmol/g vs 125.0 ± 2.1 μmol/g; P <.05). Moreover, the capacity and activity of endogenous antioxidant protective systems (glutathione 789 ± 8.0 μmol/g vs 934 ± 5.7 μmol/g, and superoxide dismutase 110 ± 9 IU/g vs 126 ± 4 IU/g; P <.05) remained higher in the ischemic postconditioning groups compared with tissues without ischemic postconditioning. At quantitative analysis, tissue injury was increased by the duration of cold preservation. The greatest injury was observed in the mucosal and submucosal layers and in the depth of crypts after 6 hours of preservation. Ischemic postconditioning significantly decreased intestinal wall injury in each group (P <.05). It was concluded that ischemic postconditioning before reperfusion mitigated oxidative stress and histologic damage during small bowel autotransplantation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955531460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955531460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2010.05.023

DO - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2010.05.023

M3 - Article

C2 - 20692464

AN - SCOPUS:77955531460

VL - 42

SP - 2287

EP - 2289

JO - Transplantation Proceedings

JF - Transplantation Proceedings

SN - 0041-1345

IS - 6

ER -