Evidence that human genes of modular proteins have retained significantly more ancestral introns than their fly or worm orthologues

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27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Comparison of the exon-intron structures of human, fly and worm orthologues of mosaic genes assembled from class 1-1 modules by exon-shuffling has revealed that human genes retained significantly more of the original inter-module introns than their protostome orthologues. It is suggested that the much higher rate of intron loss in the worm- and insect lineages than in the chordate lineage reflects their greater tendency for genome compaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-132
Number of pages6
JournalFEBS Letters
Volume565
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 7 2004

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Diptera
Introns
Genes
Exons
Chordata
Proteins
Insects
Compaction
Genome

Keywords

  • Exon-shuffling
  • Genome evolution
  • Intron gain
  • Intron loss
  • Protein module

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

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