Evaluation of the properties of microcrystalline and microfine cellulose powders

Fridrun Podczeck, P. Szabó-Révész

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A comparison of the range of microcrystalline (MCC) and microfine (MFC) cellulose from different manufacturers has been undertaken. Tests included those associated with the powder (e.g., bulk properties, particle density, particle size range, sliding friction and swelling), those associated with tablet formation (e.g., Heckel, Kawakita and force-displacement curve evaluation) and those associated with the formed tablets (e.g., mechanical strength and disintegration). Measures of bulk properties differentiated between the MCC and MFC products. Similar grades within these types were not always equivalent and divergences were not associated with particle size range. All the products possessed similar values for sliding friction. The MCC products generally had lower values for the mean yield pressure than the MFC products, although one MCC (Heweten® 10) had an atypical higher value than other MCCs. The approach of Kawakita and Lüdde (1970/71) (Powder Technol., 4 (1970/1971) 61-68) however, appeared insensitive to differences in the compressibility of the products. Treatment of the force-displacement curves by multivariate analysis of variance suggested that all the products were distinctly different. The same statistical approach applied to the relationship between mechanical strength and tabletting pressure, however, suggested that the products could be divided into three groups. The first group contained all the MCC products except one (Heweten® 12). The second group contained one MCC product (Heweten® 12) plus three MFC products, and the third group consisted of the remaining MFC products. The tablets produced at a constant force disintegrated in different times. These differences were not associated with the swelling properties of the cellulose products. Short disintegration times were often associated with tablets with poor mechanical properties. The results clearly indicate that care must be taken in changing from one cellulose product to another in an optimized tablet formulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-193
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmaceutics
Volume91
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 26 1993

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Cellulose
Powders
Tablets
Friction
Particle Size
Pressure
microcrystalline cellulose
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis

Keywords

  • Direct tabletting
  • Microcrystalline cellulose
  • Microfine cellulose
  • Multivariate analysis of variance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Evaluation of the properties of microcrystalline and microfine cellulose powders. / Podczeck, Fridrun; Szabó-Révész, P.

In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Vol. 91, No. 2-3, 26.04.1993, p. 183-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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