Ethnic background is associated with no live kidney donor identified at the time of first transplant assessment—an opportunity missed? A single-center retrospective cohort study

Ali Vedadi, Aarushi Bansal, Priscilla Yung, Olusegun Famure, Margot Mitchell, Amy D. Waterman, Sunita K. Singh, Marta Novak, Sang Joseph Kim, Istvan Mucsi

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Abstract

Patients from ethnocultural minorities have reduced access to live donor kidney transplant (LDKT). To explore early pretransplant ethnocultural disparities in LDKT readiness, and the impact of the interactions with the transplant program, we assessed if patients had a potential live donor (LD) identified at first pretransplant assessment, and if patients with no LD initially received LDKT subsequently. Single-center, retrospective cohort of adults referred for kidney transplant (KT) assessment. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the association between ethnicity and having a potential LD. Cox proportional hazard analysis assessed the association between no potential LD initially and subsequent LDKT. Of 1617 participants, 66% of Caucasians indicated having a potential LD, compared with 55% of South Asians, 44% of African Canadians, and 41% of East Asians (P < 0.001). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, the odds of having a potential LD identified was significantly lower for African, East and South Asian Canadians. No potential LD at initial KT assessment was associated with lower likelihood of LDKT subsequently (hazard ratio [HR], 0.14; [0.10–0.19]). Compared to Caucasians, African, East and South Asian and African Canadians are less likely to have a potential LD identified at first KT assessment, which predicts a lower likelihood of subsequent LDKT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1030-1043
Number of pages14
JournalTransplant International
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2019

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Keywords

  • African Canadian
  • Asian Canadian
  • equitable access
  • ethnocultural disparity
  • kidney transplant
  • live donor kidney transplant
  • transplant education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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