Estimation of the effects of longitudinal temperature gradients caused by frictional heating on the solute retention using fully porous and superficially porous sub-2μm materials

Szabolcs Fekete, J. Fekete, Davy Guillarme

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16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, the retention changes induced by frictional heating were evaluated for model small compounds (150-190. Da) and a small protein, namely insulin (5.7. kDa). For this purpose, the effect of longitudinal temperature gradient caused by frictional heating was experimentally dissociated from the combined effect of pressure and frictional heating, by working either in constant and variable inlet pressure modes. Various columns packed with core-shell and fully porous sub-2. μm particles were tested. It appears that frictional heating was less pronounced on the column packed with smallest core-shell particles (1.3. μm), compared to the ones packed with core-shell and fully porous particles of 1.7-1.8. μm. This observation was attributed to the low permeability of this material and the fact that it can only be employed in a restricted flow rate range, thus limiting the generated heat power. In addition, the thermal conductivity of the solid silica core of superficially porous particles (1.4. W/m/K) is known to be much larger than that of fully porous silica. Then, the heat dissipation is improved. However, if systems with higher pressure capability would be available and the mechanical stability of 1.3. μm core-shell material was extended to e.g. 2000. bar, the retention would be more severely impacted. At 2000. bar, ~4.4. W heat power and +30. °C increase at column outlet temperature is expected. Last but not least, when analyzing large molecules, the impact of pressure overcomes the frictional heating effects. This was demonstrated in this study with insulin (~5.7. kDa).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-130
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Chromatography A
Volume1359
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 12 2014

Fingerprint

Thermal gradients
Heating
Temperature
Pressure
Hot Temperature
Silicon Dioxide
Insulin
Thermal Conductivity
Mechanical stability
Heat losses
Permeability
Thermal conductivity
Flow rate
Molecules
Proteins

Keywords

  • Core-shell
  • Frictional heating
  • Insulin
  • Retention
  • UHPLC
  • Ultra-high pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Estimation of the effects of longitudinal temperature gradients caused by frictional heating on the solute retention using fully porous and superficially porous sub-2μm materials",
abstract = "In this study, the retention changes induced by frictional heating were evaluated for model small compounds (150-190. Da) and a small protein, namely insulin (5.7. kDa). For this purpose, the effect of longitudinal temperature gradient caused by frictional heating was experimentally dissociated from the combined effect of pressure and frictional heating, by working either in constant and variable inlet pressure modes. Various columns packed with core-shell and fully porous sub-2. μm particles were tested. It appears that frictional heating was less pronounced on the column packed with smallest core-shell particles (1.3. μm), compared to the ones packed with core-shell and fully porous particles of 1.7-1.8. μm. This observation was attributed to the low permeability of this material and the fact that it can only be employed in a restricted flow rate range, thus limiting the generated heat power. In addition, the thermal conductivity of the solid silica core of superficially porous particles (1.4. W/m/K) is known to be much larger than that of fully porous silica. Then, the heat dissipation is improved. However, if systems with higher pressure capability would be available and the mechanical stability of 1.3. μm core-shell material was extended to e.g. 2000. bar, the retention would be more severely impacted. At 2000. bar, ~4.4. W heat power and +30. °C increase at column outlet temperature is expected. Last but not least, when analyzing large molecules, the impact of pressure overcomes the frictional heating effects. This was demonstrated in this study with insulin (~5.7. kDa).",
keywords = "Core-shell, Frictional heating, Insulin, Retention, UHPLC, Ultra-high pressure",
author = "Szabolcs Fekete and J. Fekete and Davy Guillarme",
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T1 - Estimation of the effects of longitudinal temperature gradients caused by frictional heating on the solute retention using fully porous and superficially porous sub-2μm materials

AU - Fekete, Szabolcs

AU - Fekete, J.

AU - Guillarme, Davy

PY - 2014/9/12

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N2 - In this study, the retention changes induced by frictional heating were evaluated for model small compounds (150-190. Da) and a small protein, namely insulin (5.7. kDa). For this purpose, the effect of longitudinal temperature gradient caused by frictional heating was experimentally dissociated from the combined effect of pressure and frictional heating, by working either in constant and variable inlet pressure modes. Various columns packed with core-shell and fully porous sub-2. μm particles were tested. It appears that frictional heating was less pronounced on the column packed with smallest core-shell particles (1.3. μm), compared to the ones packed with core-shell and fully porous particles of 1.7-1.8. μm. This observation was attributed to the low permeability of this material and the fact that it can only be employed in a restricted flow rate range, thus limiting the generated heat power. In addition, the thermal conductivity of the solid silica core of superficially porous particles (1.4. W/m/K) is known to be much larger than that of fully porous silica. Then, the heat dissipation is improved. However, if systems with higher pressure capability would be available and the mechanical stability of 1.3. μm core-shell material was extended to e.g. 2000. bar, the retention would be more severely impacted. At 2000. bar, ~4.4. W heat power and +30. °C increase at column outlet temperature is expected. Last but not least, when analyzing large molecules, the impact of pressure overcomes the frictional heating effects. This was demonstrated in this study with insulin (~5.7. kDa).

AB - In this study, the retention changes induced by frictional heating were evaluated for model small compounds (150-190. Da) and a small protein, namely insulin (5.7. kDa). For this purpose, the effect of longitudinal temperature gradient caused by frictional heating was experimentally dissociated from the combined effect of pressure and frictional heating, by working either in constant and variable inlet pressure modes. Various columns packed with core-shell and fully porous sub-2. μm particles were tested. It appears that frictional heating was less pronounced on the column packed with smallest core-shell particles (1.3. μm), compared to the ones packed with core-shell and fully porous particles of 1.7-1.8. μm. This observation was attributed to the low permeability of this material and the fact that it can only be employed in a restricted flow rate range, thus limiting the generated heat power. In addition, the thermal conductivity of the solid silica core of superficially porous particles (1.4. W/m/K) is known to be much larger than that of fully porous silica. Then, the heat dissipation is improved. However, if systems with higher pressure capability would be available and the mechanical stability of 1.3. μm core-shell material was extended to e.g. 2000. bar, the retention would be more severely impacted. At 2000. bar, ~4.4. W heat power and +30. °C increase at column outlet temperature is expected. Last but not least, when analyzing large molecules, the impact of pressure overcomes the frictional heating effects. This was demonstrated in this study with insulin (~5.7. kDa).

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