Equity and Value in ‘Precision Medicine’

Muir Gray, Tyra Lagerberg, V. Dombrádi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Precision medicine carries huge potential in the treatment of many diseases, particularly those with high-penetrance monogenic underpinnings. However, precision medicine through genomic technologies also has ethical implications. We will define allocative, personal, and technical value (‘triple value’) in healthcare and how this relates to equity. Equity is here taken to be implicit in the concept of triple value in countries that have publicly funded healthcare systems. It will be argued that precision medicine risks concentrating resources to those that already experience greater access to healthcare and power in society, nationally as well as globally. Healthcare payers, clinicians, and patients must all be involved in optimising the potential of precision medicine, without reducing equity. Throughout, the discussion will refer to the NHS RightCare Programme, which is a national initiative aiming to improve value and equity in the context of NHS England.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-94
Number of pages8
JournalNew Bioethics
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2 2017

Fingerprint

Precision Medicine
Delivery of Health Care
Penetrance
England
Technology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • equity
  • genomics
  • healthcare
  • personalised medicine
  • power
  • value

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Health Policy
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Equity and Value in ‘Precision Medicine’. / Gray, Muir; Lagerberg, Tyra; Dombrádi, V.

In: New Bioethics, Vol. 23, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 87-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gray, Muir ; Lagerberg, Tyra ; Dombrádi, V. / Equity and Value in ‘Precision Medicine’. In: New Bioethics. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 87-94.
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