Epigenetic alterations of viral and cellular genomes in EBV-infected cells

Ingemar Ernberg, Hans Helmut Niller, J. Mináróvits

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a human herpesvirus, replicates in oropharyngeal epithelial cells and establishes latency in memory B cells. A series of neoplasms including lymphomas, carcinomas, and leiomyosarcomas also carry latent EBV genomes. The viral episomes are subject to epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and formation of chromatin loops in various host cells. These epigenetic alterations control the host celldependent activity of latent EBV promoters. Viral methylomes, i.e., the CpG methylation patterns of the latent episomes, also vary, depending on the host cell phenotype. Although there are distinct, invariably unmethylated regions in EBV genomes, like sequences within oriP, the latent origin of EBV replication, the overall level methylation of the viral episomes is high in Burkitt’s lymphomas (BLs) and nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs), whereas lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) carry hypomethylated viral genomes. Latency products, including nuclear and transmembrane proteins expressed in EBV-infected cells, interact either directly or indirectly with the epigenetic machinery of the host cell and may modify its epigenotype and gene expression pattern. Such epigenetic alterations may play a role in the development of EBV-associated neoplasms. Recently, the methylomes of EBV-positive BLs, NPCs, and EBV-associated gastric carcinomas (EBVaGCs) were thoroughly analyzed. These tumors exhibited a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) characterized with a dysregulation of gene expression due to the silencing of key cellular promoters. In contrast, a complete genomic bisulfite sequence analysis of quiescent B cells and in vitro EBV-infected B lymphoblasts revealed a profound, genome-wide demethylation suggesting that the epigenetic events associated with B-cell immortalization, a possible counterpart of the development of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), differ from the epigenetic dysregulation observed in BLs, NPCs, and EBVaGCs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEpigenetics and Human Health
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages91-122
Number of pages32
Volumenone
ISBN (Print)9783319271842
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventInternational Conference on A Different Way of Looking at Genetics, 2014 - Bayern, Germany
Duration: Sep 15 2014Sep 17 2014

Publication series

NameEpigenetics and Human Health
Volumenone
ISSN (Print)21912262
ISSN (Electronic)21912270

Other

OtherInternational Conference on A Different Way of Looking at Genetics, 2014
CountryGermany
CityBayern
Period9/15/149/17/14

Fingerprint

Viral Genome
Viruses
Epigenomics
Genes
Plasmids
B-Lymphocytes
Burkitt Lymphoma
Genome
Cells
Carcinoma
Human Herpesvirus 4
Methylation
Stomach
Histone Code
Gene expression
Phenotype
Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1
Gene Expression
Neoplasms
CpG Islands

Keywords

  • Epigenetic regulation
  • Epigenetic reprogramming
  • Epstein–Barr virus
  • Methylome
  • Tumor virus
  • Viral epigenotype
  • Viral latency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Genetics

Cite this

Ernberg, I., Niller, H. H., & Mináróvits, J. (2016). Epigenetic alterations of viral and cellular genomes in EBV-infected cells. In Epigenetics and Human Health (Vol. none, pp. 91-122). (Epigenetics and Human Health; Vol. none). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27186-6_6

Epigenetic alterations of viral and cellular genomes in EBV-infected cells. / Ernberg, Ingemar; Niller, Hans Helmut; Mináróvits, J.

Epigenetics and Human Health. Vol. none Springer Verlag, 2016. p. 91-122 (Epigenetics and Human Health; Vol. none).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ernberg, I, Niller, HH & Mináróvits, J 2016, Epigenetic alterations of viral and cellular genomes in EBV-infected cells. in Epigenetics and Human Health. vol. none, Epigenetics and Human Health, vol. none, Springer Verlag, pp. 91-122, International Conference on A Different Way of Looking at Genetics, 2014, Bayern, Germany, 9/15/14. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27186-6_6
Ernberg I, Niller HH, Mináróvits J. Epigenetic alterations of viral and cellular genomes in EBV-infected cells. In Epigenetics and Human Health. Vol. none. Springer Verlag. 2016. p. 91-122. (Epigenetics and Human Health). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27186-6_6
Ernberg, Ingemar ; Niller, Hans Helmut ; Mináróvits, J. / Epigenetic alterations of viral and cellular genomes in EBV-infected cells. Epigenetics and Human Health. Vol. none Springer Verlag, 2016. pp. 91-122 (Epigenetics and Human Health).
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