Epidemiology of syphilis in Hungary between 1952 and 1996

Viktória Várkonyi, Timea Tisza, Attila Horváth, Teréz Takácsy, Margit Berecz, György Kulcsár, Miklós Sárdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trends in morbidity from syphilis in Hungary between 1952 and 1996 were analysed. The incidence of syphilis/100,000 inhabitants declined rapidly owing to the public health and therapeutic measures of the early 1950s (1952: total = 73.6, early infections = 60.2; 1962: total = 13.7, early infections = 8.7). After a temporary, slight increase until 1973 the number of reported syphilis cases declined continuously between 1978 and 1989 (1989: total = 0.9, early infections = 0.84). In 1994 a marked increase occurred when compared with 1993 (1993: total = early: 1.4. 1994: total = 2.3, early infections = 2.2). Incidence trends were statistically analysed using Chi-square test and linear regression. Chi-square analysis showed that the changes in the incidence of total and early syphilis are significant (P < 0.00001) comparing the time intervals 1952-1962 with 1962-1966 and 1975-1979 with 1988-1992. The same trends were found using the linear regression test, except for the time interval of 1960-1973.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-333
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 18 2000

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Historical review
  • Syphilis
  • Venereal diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Várkonyi, V., Tisza, T., Horváth, A., Takácsy, T., Berecz, M., Kulcsár, G., & Sárdy, M. (2000). Epidemiology of syphilis in Hungary between 1952 and 1996. International Journal of STD and AIDS, 11(5), 327-333. https://doi.org/10.1258/0956462001915967