A human toxocarosis mint egy gyakori urbanizált zoonosis epidemiológiája és közegészségügyi kihatásai.

Translated title of the contribution: Epidemiology and public health consequences of human toxocariasis as a frequently occurring urban zoonosis

E. Fok, F. Rozgonyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors give a review mainly about that worm species of the endoparasites of dogs and cats which are more frequently dangerous for the people living in urban circumstances because of the dissemination faeces of these animals. The life cycle of the nematode Toxocara species in dogs and cats as the final hosts, in inadequate++ hosts like man and the consequences of the zoonoses caused by these worms are briefly discussed. The authors survey the epidemiology, clinical appearances and the prevalence of human infections according to the data of the Hungarian and foreign literature. The clinical symptoms and the danger of this parasitosis running with the increasing number of the pet animals are pointed out. It is emphasized that the wide-range explanatory work and the role of the owners of pets in the decrease of the risks are very important, moreover that organizing the struggle against zoonoses such as toxocarosis is mainly veterinary task, however, its control is common medical and veterinary interest. The recognition, identification, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of human infections can only be effective with the proper knowledge in this zoonosis. Toxocarosis is one of the most frequent helminthozoonoses of townspeople in Hungary.

Translated title of the contributionEpidemiology and public health consequences of human toxocariasis as a frequently occurring urban zoonosis
Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1513-1518
Number of pages6
JournalOrvosi hetilap
Volume140
Issue number27
Publication statusPublished - Jul 4 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Epidemiology and public health consequences of human toxocariasis as a frequently occurring urban zoonosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this