Environmental toxicity testing of contaminated soil based on microcalorimetry

K. Gruiz, V. Feigl, Cs Hajdu, M. Tolner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Contaminated site assessment and monitoring requires efficient risk-management tools including innovative environmental toxicity tests. The first application of microcalorimetry for toxicity testing draw the attention to a possible new tool to increase sensitivity, to eliminate matrix effect and to study effect-mechanism. A Thermal Activity Monitor (TAM) microcalorimeter was used for measuring the heat production of various test organisms when getting in contact with sterile toxic soils. Well known bacterial (Azomonas agilis), animal (Folsomia candida) and plant test organisms (Sinapis alba) were tested for heat production. The heat response of selected testorganisms was measured in case of metal (Cu and Zn) and organic pollutant (Diesel oil, DBNPA and PCP) contaminated soils. In addition to the quantitative determination of the heat production, the mechanism of the toxic effect can be characterized from the shape of the power-time curve (slope of the curve, height and time of the maximum). In certain concentration ranges the higher the pollutant concentration of the soil the lower the maximum of the time-heat curve. At low pollutant concentrations an increased heat production was measured in case of A. agile and 20 and 200 mg Zn kg-1 soil. The microcalorimetric testing was more sensitive in all cases than the traditional test methods. Our results showed that the microcalorimetric test method offers a new and sensitive option in environmental toxicology, both for research and routine testing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

heat production
Thermogenesis
Toxicity
Soil
toxicity
Soils
Hot Temperature
Poisons
Testing
Pseudomonadaceae
Soil Pollutants
Sinapis
Ecotoxicology
Toxicity Tests
soil
PCP
Risk Management
toxicology
toxicity test
Candida

Keywords

  • Microcalorimetry
  • Sensitive endpoint
  • Soil toxicity testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Environmental toxicity testing of contaminated soil based on microcalorimetry. / Gruiz, K.; Feigl, V.; Hajdu, Cs; Tolner, M.

In: Environmental Toxicology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 10.2010, p. 479-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gruiz, K. ; Feigl, V. ; Hajdu, Cs ; Tolner, M. / Environmental toxicity testing of contaminated soil based on microcalorimetry. In: Environmental Toxicology. 2010 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 479-486.
@article{3386d7bd55b544c69f1795d50d2f1887,
title = "Environmental toxicity testing of contaminated soil based on microcalorimetry",
abstract = "Contaminated site assessment and monitoring requires efficient risk-management tools including innovative environmental toxicity tests. The first application of microcalorimetry for toxicity testing draw the attention to a possible new tool to increase sensitivity, to eliminate matrix effect and to study effect-mechanism. A Thermal Activity Monitor (TAM) microcalorimeter was used for measuring the heat production of various test organisms when getting in contact with sterile toxic soils. Well known bacterial (Azomonas agilis), animal (Folsomia candida) and plant test organisms (Sinapis alba) were tested for heat production. The heat response of selected testorganisms was measured in case of metal (Cu and Zn) and organic pollutant (Diesel oil, DBNPA and PCP) contaminated soils. In addition to the quantitative determination of the heat production, the mechanism of the toxic effect can be characterized from the shape of the power-time curve (slope of the curve, height and time of the maximum). In certain concentration ranges the higher the pollutant concentration of the soil the lower the maximum of the time-heat curve. At low pollutant concentrations an increased heat production was measured in case of A. agile and 20 and 200 mg Zn kg-1 soil. The microcalorimetric testing was more sensitive in all cases than the traditional test methods. Our results showed that the microcalorimetric test method offers a new and sensitive option in environmental toxicology, both for research and routine testing.",
keywords = "Microcalorimetry, Sensitive endpoint, Soil toxicity testing",
author = "K. Gruiz and V. Feigl and Cs Hajdu and M. Tolner",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1002/tox.20592",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "479--486",
journal = "Environmental Toxicology",
issn = "1520-4081",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Environmental toxicity testing of contaminated soil based on microcalorimetry

AU - Gruiz, K.

AU - Feigl, V.

AU - Hajdu, Cs

AU - Tolner, M.

PY - 2010/10

Y1 - 2010/10

N2 - Contaminated site assessment and monitoring requires efficient risk-management tools including innovative environmental toxicity tests. The first application of microcalorimetry for toxicity testing draw the attention to a possible new tool to increase sensitivity, to eliminate matrix effect and to study effect-mechanism. A Thermal Activity Monitor (TAM) microcalorimeter was used for measuring the heat production of various test organisms when getting in contact with sterile toxic soils. Well known bacterial (Azomonas agilis), animal (Folsomia candida) and plant test organisms (Sinapis alba) were tested for heat production. The heat response of selected testorganisms was measured in case of metal (Cu and Zn) and organic pollutant (Diesel oil, DBNPA and PCP) contaminated soils. In addition to the quantitative determination of the heat production, the mechanism of the toxic effect can be characterized from the shape of the power-time curve (slope of the curve, height and time of the maximum). In certain concentration ranges the higher the pollutant concentration of the soil the lower the maximum of the time-heat curve. At low pollutant concentrations an increased heat production was measured in case of A. agile and 20 and 200 mg Zn kg-1 soil. The microcalorimetric testing was more sensitive in all cases than the traditional test methods. Our results showed that the microcalorimetric test method offers a new and sensitive option in environmental toxicology, both for research and routine testing.

AB - Contaminated site assessment and monitoring requires efficient risk-management tools including innovative environmental toxicity tests. The first application of microcalorimetry for toxicity testing draw the attention to a possible new tool to increase sensitivity, to eliminate matrix effect and to study effect-mechanism. A Thermal Activity Monitor (TAM) microcalorimeter was used for measuring the heat production of various test organisms when getting in contact with sterile toxic soils. Well known bacterial (Azomonas agilis), animal (Folsomia candida) and plant test organisms (Sinapis alba) were tested for heat production. The heat response of selected testorganisms was measured in case of metal (Cu and Zn) and organic pollutant (Diesel oil, DBNPA and PCP) contaminated soils. In addition to the quantitative determination of the heat production, the mechanism of the toxic effect can be characterized from the shape of the power-time curve (slope of the curve, height and time of the maximum). In certain concentration ranges the higher the pollutant concentration of the soil the lower the maximum of the time-heat curve. At low pollutant concentrations an increased heat production was measured in case of A. agile and 20 and 200 mg Zn kg-1 soil. The microcalorimetric testing was more sensitive in all cases than the traditional test methods. Our results showed that the microcalorimetric test method offers a new and sensitive option in environmental toxicology, both for research and routine testing.

KW - Microcalorimetry

KW - Sensitive endpoint

KW - Soil toxicity testing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77957675872&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77957675872&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/tox.20592

DO - 10.1002/tox.20592

M3 - Article

C2 - 20549622

AN - SCOPUS:77957675872

VL - 25

SP - 479

EP - 486

JO - Environmental Toxicology

JF - Environmental Toxicology

SN - 1520-4081

IS - 5

ER -