Entrainment of neuronal oscillations as a mechanism of attentional selection

Peter Lakatos, G. Karmos, Ashesh D. Mehta, I. Ulbert, Charles E. Schroeder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

834 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whereas gamma-band neuronal oscillations clearly appear integral to visual attention, the role of lower-frequency oscillations is still being debated. Mounting evidence indicates that a key functional property of these oscillations is the rhythmic shifting of excitability in local neuronal ensembles. Here, we show that when attended stimuli are in a rhythmic stream, delta-band oscillations in the primary visual cortex entrain to the rhythm of the stream, resulting in increased response gain for task-relevant events and decreased reaction times. Because of hierarchical cross-frequency coupling, delta phase also determines momentary power in higher-frequency activity. These instrumental functions of low-frequency oscillations support a conceptual framework that integrates numerous earlier findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-113
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume320
Issue number5872
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 5 2008

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Visual Cortex

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Entrainment of neuronal oscillations as a mechanism of attentional selection. / Lakatos, Peter; Karmos, G.; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Ulbert, I.; Schroeder, Charles E.

In: Science, Vol. 320, No. 5872, 05.04.2008, p. 110-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lakatos, Peter ; Karmos, G. ; Mehta, Ashesh D. ; Ulbert, I. ; Schroeder, Charles E. / Entrainment of neuronal oscillations as a mechanism of attentional selection. In: Science. 2008 ; Vol. 320, No. 5872. pp. 110-113.
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