Enhanced association of mutant triosephosphate isomerase to red cell membranes and to brain microtubules

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Abstract

In a Hungarian family with triosephosphate isomerase (TPI; D- glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate keto-isomerase, EC 5.3.1.1) deficiency, two germ- line identical, but phenotypically differing compound heterozygote brothers (one of them with neurological disorder) have been identified with the same very low (< 5%) TPI activity and 20- or 40-fold higher erythrocyte dihydroxyacetone phosphate levels as compared with normal controls. Our present studies with purified TPI and hemolysates revealed the binding of TPI, and the binding of human wild-type and mutant TPIs in hemolysate, to the red cell membrane, and the interference of binding with other hemolysate proteins. The binding of the mutant TPI is enhanced as compared with the wild-type enzyme. The increased binding is influenced by both the altered structure of the mutant and the changes in the red cell membrane. Compared with binding of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the isomerase binding is much less sensitive to ionic strength or blocking of the N- terminal tail of the band-3 transmembrane protein. The binding of TPIs to the membrane decreases the isomerase activity, resulting in extremely high dihydroxyacetone phosphate levels in deficient cells. In cell-free brain extract, tubulin copolymerizes with TPI and with other cytosolic proteins forming highly decorated microtubules as shown by immunoblot analysis with anti-TPI antibody and by electron microscopic images. The efficacy order of TPI binding to microtubules is propositus > brother without neurological disorder > normal control. This distinct microcompartmentation of mutant proteins may be relevant in the development of the neurodegenerative process in TPI deficiency and in other, more common neurological diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1026-1031
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2000

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