Energy partitioning schemes: A dilemma

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Abstract

Two closely related energy partitioning schemes, in which the total energy is presented as a sum of atomic and diatomic contributions by using the "atomic decomposition of identity", are compared on the example of N, N-dimethylformamide, a simple but chemically rich molecule. Both schemes account for different intramolecular interactions, for instance they identify the weak C-H⋯O intramolecular interactions, but give completely different numbers. (The energy decomposition scheme based on the virial theorem is also considered.) The comparison of the two schemes resulted in a dilemma which is especially striking when these schemes are applied for molecules distorted from their equilibrium structures: one either gets numbers which are "on the chemical scale" and have quite appealing values at the equilibrium molecular geometries, but exhibiting a counter-intuitive distance dependence (the two-center energy components increase in absolute value with the increase of the interatomic distances) - or numbers with too large absolute values but "correct" distance behaviour. The problem is connected with the quick decay of the diatomic kinetic energy components.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-450
Number of pages12
JournalFaraday Discussions
Volume135
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Decomposition
Dimethylformamide
Molecules
Kinetic energy
decomposition
virial theorem
Geometry
energy
molecules
counters
kinetic energy
interactions
decay
geometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Energy partitioning schemes : A dilemma. / Mayer, I.

In: Faraday Discussions, Vol. 135, 2007, p. 439-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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