Endoscopic arytenoid lateropexy for isolated posterior glottic stenosis

László Rovó, Kincsõ Venczel, Attila Torkos, Valéria Majoros, Balázs Sztanó, J. Jóri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: A posterior glottic stenosis (PGS) may limit the abduction of the arytenoid cartilages. One option for the treatment of dyspnea in lower grade stenoses is endoscopic laterofixation of the vocal cords after scar excision. In our prospective study, we assess a refined method for effective endoscopic mobilization and lateropexy of the arytenoid cartilages. Study Design and Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients with PGS underwent surgery. Endoscopically, the scar between the arytenoid cartilages was transected with a CO2 laser. The scars that had spread into the cricoarytenoid joint were transected with a rightangled endolaryngeal scythe designed for this purpose. The lateropexy of the adequately mobilized arytenoid cartilages was performed with a reinforced Lichtenberger's needle carrier instrument, with consideration of the real abduction of the cricoarytenoid joint. Results: Twenty-eight patients achieved an excellent breathing ability, only effort dyspnea remained in three cases. One patient could not be decannulated due to aspiration. The early postoperative improvement in the airway function test results showed no relationship with the grade of stenoses. However, in cases of higher grade stenoses with bilateral joint damage, the later postoperative airway function results had decreased slightly. In 25 cases, phonation significantly improved after the removal of the fixing sutures. Conclusions: After proper mobilization, endoscopic arytenoid lateropexy can be considered as a minimally invasive function-preserving procedure even for severe PGS. This treatment option provides stable improvements in breathing ability and good voice quality without the need for tracheostomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1550-1555
Number of pages6
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume118
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Arytenoid Cartilage
Tongue
Pathologic Constriction
Cicatrix
Joints
Dyspnea
Respiration
Voice Quality
Phonation
Gas Lasers
Vocal Cords
Tracheostomy
Sutures
Needles
Prospective Studies
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Endoscopic laryngeal microsurgery
  • Posterior glottic stenosis
  • Vocal cord immobility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Endoscopic arytenoid lateropexy for isolated posterior glottic stenosis. / Rovó, László; Venczel, Kincsõ; Torkos, Attila; Majoros, Valéria; Sztanó, Balázs; Jóri, J.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 118, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 1550-1555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rovó, L, Venczel, K, Torkos, A, Majoros, V, Sztanó, B & Jóri, J 2008, 'Endoscopic arytenoid lateropexy for isolated posterior glottic stenosis', Laryngoscope, vol. 118, no. 9, pp. 1550-1555. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLG.0b013e31817c0b32
Rovó, László ; Venczel, Kincsõ ; Torkos, Attila ; Majoros, Valéria ; Sztanó, Balázs ; Jóri, J. / Endoscopic arytenoid lateropexy for isolated posterior glottic stenosis. In: Laryngoscope. 2008 ; Vol. 118, No. 9. pp. 1550-1555.
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