Enabling scientific workflow sharing through coarse-grained interoperability

Gabor Terstyanszky, Tamas Kukla, Tamas Kiss, P. Kacsuk, Akos Balasko, Zoltan Farkas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

E-scientists want to run their scientific experiments on Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI) to be able to access large pools of resources and services. To run experiments on these infrastructures requires specific expertise that e-scientists may not have. Workflows can hide resources and services as a virtualization layer providing a user interface that e-scientists can use. There are many workflow systems used by research communities but they are not interoperable. To learn a workflow system and create workflows in this workflow system may require significant efforts from e-scientists. Considering these efforts it is not reasonable to expect that research communities will learn new workflow systems if they want to run workflows developed in other workflow systems. The solution is to create workflow interoperability solutions to allow workflow sharing. The FP7 Sharing Interoperable Workflow for Large-Scale Scientific Simulation on Available DCIs (SHIWA) project developed two interoperability solutions to support workflow sharing: Coarse-Grained Interoperability (CGI) and Fine-Grained Interoperability (FGI). The project created the SHIWA Simulation Platform (SSP) to implement the Coarse-Grained Interoperability approach as a production-level service for research communities. The paper describes the CGI approach and how it enables sharing and combining existing workflows into complex applications and run them on Distributed Computing Infrastructures. The paper also outlines the architecture, components and usage scenarios of the simulation platform.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-59
Number of pages14
JournalFuture Generation Computer Systems
Volume37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Fingerprint

Interoperability
Distributed computer systems
User interfaces
Experiments

Keywords

  • Distributed Computing Infrastructure
  • Simulation platform
  • Workflow
  • Workflow interoperability
  • Workflow repository

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Software
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Enabling scientific workflow sharing through coarse-grained interoperability. / Terstyanszky, Gabor; Kukla, Tamas; Kiss, Tamas; Kacsuk, P.; Balasko, Akos; Farkas, Zoltan.

In: Future Generation Computer Systems, Vol. 37, 07.2014, p. 46-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terstyanszky, Gabor ; Kukla, Tamas ; Kiss, Tamas ; Kacsuk, P. ; Balasko, Akos ; Farkas, Zoltan. / Enabling scientific workflow sharing through coarse-grained interoperability. In: Future Generation Computer Systems. 2014 ; Vol. 37. pp. 46-59.
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