Elevated levels of gonadotrophins but not sex steroids are associated with musculoskeletal pain in middle-aged and older European men

Abdelouahid Tajar, John McBeth, David M. Lee, Gary J. MacFarlane, Ilpo T. Huhtaniemi, Joseph D. Finn, G. Bártfai, Steven Boonen, Felipe F. Casanueva, Gianni Forti, Aleksander Giwercman, Thang S. Han, Krzysztof Kula, Fernand Labrie, Michael E J Lean, Neil Pendleton, Margus Punab, Alan J. Silman, Dirk Vanderschueren, Terence W. O'NeillFrederick C W Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the association of hormone levels with the occurrence of musculoskeletal pain. Men ages 40 to 79 years were recruited from population registers in 8 European centres. Subjects were asked to complete a postal questionnaire, which enquired about lifestyle and the occurrence of musculoskeletal pain over the past month. Total testosterone (T), oestradiol (E2), luteinising hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were assayed from a fasting blood sample. The association between pain status and hormone levels was assessed using multinomial logistic regression with results expressed as relative risk ratios (RRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 3206 men had complete data on pain status. Of these, 8.7% reported chronic widespread pain (CWP), whereas 50% had some pain although not CWP and were classified as having some pain. T and E2 were not associated with musculoskeletal pain, whereas significant differences in LH and FSH levels were found between pain groups. After adjustment for age and other possible confounders, the association between pain status and both LH and FSH persisted. Compared with those in the lowest tertile of LH, those in the highest tertile were more likely to report some pain (vs no pain, RRR = 1.28; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.50) and also CWP (vs no pain, RRR = 1.51; 95% CI 1.10 to 2.07). Similar results were found for FSH. Gonadotrophins, but not sex steroid hormone levels, are associated with musculoskeletal pain in men. Higher levels of gonadotrophins but not androgens were significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain in men. Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular feedback mechanisms may play a role in the onset of chronic widespread pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1495-1501
Number of pages7
JournalPain
Volume152
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Fingerprint

Musculoskeletal Pain
Gonadotropins
Steroids
Pain
Follicle Stimulating Hormone
Luteinizing Hormone
Chronic Pain
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hormones
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Androgens
Registries
Testosterone
Life Style
Estradiol
Fasting
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • American College of Rheumatology
  • Epidemiology
  • European Male Ageing Study
  • Musculoskeletal pain
  • Reproductive hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Tajar, A., McBeth, J., Lee, D. M., MacFarlane, G. J., Huhtaniemi, I. T., Finn, J. D., ... Wu, F. C. W. (2011). Elevated levels of gonadotrophins but not sex steroids are associated with musculoskeletal pain in middle-aged and older European men. Pain, 152(7), 1495-1501. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2011.01.048

Elevated levels of gonadotrophins but not sex steroids are associated with musculoskeletal pain in middle-aged and older European men. / Tajar, Abdelouahid; McBeth, John; Lee, David M.; MacFarlane, Gary J.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Finn, Joseph D.; Bártfai, G.; Boonen, Steven; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Kula, Krzysztof; Labrie, Fernand; Lean, Michael E J; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; O'Neill, Terence W.; Wu, Frederick C W.

In: Pain, Vol. 152, No. 7, 07.2011, p. 1495-1501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tajar, A, McBeth, J, Lee, DM, MacFarlane, GJ, Huhtaniemi, IT, Finn, JD, Bártfai, G, Boonen, S, Casanueva, FF, Forti, G, Giwercman, A, Han, TS, Kula, K, Labrie, F, Lean, MEJ, Pendleton, N, Punab, M, Silman, AJ, Vanderschueren, D, O'Neill, TW & Wu, FCW 2011, 'Elevated levels of gonadotrophins but not sex steroids are associated with musculoskeletal pain in middle-aged and older European men', Pain, vol. 152, no. 7, pp. 1495-1501. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2011.01.048
Tajar, Abdelouahid ; McBeth, John ; Lee, David M. ; MacFarlane, Gary J. ; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T. ; Finn, Joseph D. ; Bártfai, G. ; Boonen, Steven ; Casanueva, Felipe F. ; Forti, Gianni ; Giwercman, Aleksander ; Han, Thang S. ; Kula, Krzysztof ; Labrie, Fernand ; Lean, Michael E J ; Pendleton, Neil ; Punab, Margus ; Silman, Alan J. ; Vanderschueren, Dirk ; O'Neill, Terence W. ; Wu, Frederick C W. / Elevated levels of gonadotrophins but not sex steroids are associated with musculoskeletal pain in middle-aged and older European men. In: Pain. 2011 ; Vol. 152, No. 7. pp. 1495-1501.
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