Effects of relatedness on social-foraging tactic use in house sparrows

Zoltán Tóth, V. Bókony, Ádám Z. Lendvai, Krisztián Szabó, Z. Pénzes, A. Likér

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kin selection is often important in the evolution of reproductive behaviour, but we know much less about its significance for nonreproductive social groups. We investigated whether relatedness affects social-foraging behaviour in captive house sparrow, Passer domesticus, flocks, where birds may either search for food or exploit flockmates' food findings by scrounging. In such systems, both increased and decreased frequency of scrounging from relatives can be predicted by kin selection theory, depending on the relative costs and benefits of exploiting close kin. We found that birds used aggressive joining less often and obtained less food by that tactic from their close kin than from unrelated flockmates. In nonaggressive joinings, males also tended to join less often and obtained less food from close kin flockmates than from unrelated birds, whereas an opposite trend was found in females. Close kin males also spent less time feeding together from the same food patch than unrelated males, further suggesting reduced exploitation by male kin. These results suggest that house sparrows are able to recognize their close kin flockmates and reduce aggressive scrounging towards them, and that the sexes may differ in some forms of kin exploitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-342
Number of pages6
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009

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Passer domesticus
relatedness
foraging
kin selection
food
birds
bird
reproductive behavior
social behavior
foraging behavior
flocks
effect
gender
cost

Keywords

  • genetic relatedness
  • house sparrow
  • kin discrimination
  • Passer domesticus
  • scrounging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Effects of relatedness on social-foraging tactic use in house sparrows. / Tóth, Zoltán; Bókony, V.; Lendvai, Ádám Z.; Szabó, Krisztián; Pénzes, Z.; Likér, A.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 77, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 337-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tóth, Zoltán ; Bókony, V. ; Lendvai, Ádám Z. ; Szabó, Krisztián ; Pénzes, Z. ; Likér, A. / Effects of relatedness on social-foraging tactic use in house sparrows. In: Animal Behaviour. 2009 ; Vol. 77, No. 2. pp. 337-342.
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