Effects of protein-energy malnutrition and human immunodeficiency virus- 1 infection on essential fatty acid metabolism in children

T. Decsi, Berthold Koletzko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This report summarizes data on the availability of essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) metabolites in protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV- 1) infection for which less information is available, and the combination of both PEM and HIV-1. The contribution of different EFAs and LCPUFAs to the fatty-acid composition of plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipids was found to be reduced in children with PEM in comparison with well-nourished children. In addition to limited dietary EFA supply, reduced bioconversion of EFAs to their respective LCPUFA metabolites and/or peroxidative degradation of LCPUFAs may contribute to the reduction of LCPUFA status in malnourished children. Restoration of normal energy, protein, and EFA intakes does not appear to readily correct abnormalities of plasma and erythrocyte membrane LCPUFA values. Enhanced dietary supply of LCPUFAs and/or improved supply of antioxidant vitamins may represent novel therapeutic modalities in severe PEM. With and without PEM, HIV infection was related to altered availability of various EFAs and LCPUFAs in HIV-seropositive children. The plasma total lipid fatty-acid profiles seen in well-nourished children with HIV infection were compatible with an HIV infection-related enhancement of the metabolic activity of the conversion of EFAs to their respective LCPUFA metabolites. However, the plasma phospholipid EFA and LCPUFA profiles seen in severely malnourished children with HIV infection more closely resembled those seen in children with PEM but without HIV infection than in those in children with HIV infection but no PEM. Metabolic studies using stable isotope-labeled fatty acids may contribute to better understanding of the HIV-related changes in EFA metabolism and clearly are needed before therapeutic conclusions can be drawn. (C) Elsevier Science Inc. 2000.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-453
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2000

Fingerprint

Protein-Energy Malnutrition
Essential Fatty Acids
Virus Diseases
HIV-1
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
HIV Infections
Fatty Acids
Erythrocyte Membrane
Cell Membrane
HIV
Membrane Lipids
Vitamins
Isotopes
Phospholipids
Antioxidants
Lipids

Keywords

  • Arachidonic acid
  • Children
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Essential fatty acids
  • Human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection
  • Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids
  • Protein-energy malnutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Surgery
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Effects of protein-energy malnutrition and human immunodeficiency virus- 1 infection on essential fatty acid metabolism in children. / Decsi, T.; Koletzko, Berthold.

In: Nutrition, Vol. 16, No. 6, 06.2000, p. 447-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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