Effects of photo and thermo cycles on flowering time in barley

A genetical phenomics approach

I. Karsai, P. Szucs, B. Koszegi, P. M. Hayes, A. Casas, Z. Bedő, O. Veisz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of synchronous photo (16 h daylength) and thermo (2°C daily fluctuation) cycles on flowering time were compared with constant light and temperature treatments using two barley mapping populations derived from the facultative cultivar 'Dicktoo'. The 'Dicktoo'x'Morex' (spring) population (DM) segregates for functional differences in alleles of candidate genes for VRN-H1, VRN-H3, PPD-H1, and PPD-H2. The first two loci are associated with the vernalization response and the latter two with photoperiod sensitivity. The 'Dicktoo'x'Kompolti korai' (winter) population (DK) has a known functional polymorphism only at VRN-H2, a locus associated with vernalization sensitivity. Flowering time in both populations was accelerated when there was no fluctuating factor in the environment and was delayed to the greatest extent with the application of synchronous photo and thermo cycles. Alleles at VRN-H1, VRN-H2, PPD-H1, and PPD-H2 - and their interactions - were found to be significant determinants of the increase/decrease in days to flower. Under synchronous photo and thermo cycles, plants with the Dicktoo (recessive) VRN-H1 allele flowered significantly later than those with the Kompolti korai (recessive) or Morex (dominant) VRN-H1 alleles. The Dicktoo VRN-H1 allele, together with the late-flowering allele at PPD-H1 and PPD-H2, led to the greatest delay. The application of synchronous photo and thermo cycles changed the epistatic interaction between VRN-H2 and VRN-H1: plants with Dicktoo type VRN-H1 flowered late, regardless of the allele phase at VRN-H2. Our results are novel in demonstrating the large effects of minor variations in environmental signals on flowering time: for example, a 2°C thermo cycle caused a delay in flowering time of 70 d as compared to a constant temperature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2707-2715
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume59
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2008

Fingerprint

Hordeum
Tuberculin
Alleles
barley
flowering
alleles
vernalization
Population
photoperiod
loci
Temperature
Photoperiod
phenomics
temperature
genetic polymorphism
flowers
Light
environmental factors
winter
cultivars

Keywords

  • BM5A
  • Hordeum vulgare
  • HvFT1
  • HvFT3
  • HvPRR7
  • ZCCT-H

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Effects of photo and thermo cycles on flowering time in barley : A genetical phenomics approach. / Karsai, I.; Szucs, P.; Koszegi, B.; Hayes, P. M.; Casas, A.; Bedő, Z.; Veisz, O.

In: Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 59, No. 10, 07.2008, p. 2707-2715.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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