Effects of Phenylamide Pesticides on the GSH-Conjugation System of Phytophthora spp. Fungi

Gyula Oros, T. Kőmíves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phytophthora cactorum, Ph. cambivora, Ph. cinnamomi, Ph. citricola, Ph. cryptogea, Ph. drechsleri, Ph. infestans, Ph. megasperma, Ph. parasitica, and Ph. syringae contain GSH-conju-gation systems as indicated by the presence of active GST enzyme in addition to GSH. Basal levels of both GSH and GST in the thalli of Phytophthora strains studied did not correlate with either fungal sensitivity to phenylamides (acetochlor, butachlor, metolachlor, dimethachlor, propachlor, ofurace, CGA-29212, metalaxyl, RE-26745, benalaxyl, furalaxyl, LAB-149202) or their acquired resistance to metalaxyl. Thalli of Phytophthora strains from axenic cultures exposed to sublethal concentrations of the above pesticides contained significantly higher levels of both GSH and GST than the untreated controls. This response was independent of the sensitivity and tolerance of the strains to phenylamides. When the responses of Phytophthora strains to phenylamide chemicals were compared by means of principal component analysis, four independent components were detected accounting for 88% of the total variation. Biological properties (basal and induced levels of GST and GSH, growth intensity, degree of acquired resistance to metalaxyl, sensitivity to propiconazole and to cis- and trans-tridemorph) of the strains contributed differently to this variation. It was concluded that, in contrast to plants, sensitivity or tolerance of Phytophthora species to phenylamide pesticides is not regulated by the efficiency of the GSH-conjugation system. In addition, our data clearly indicate that the acetanilide pesticides have multiple sites of action in the Phytophthora genus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)866-874
Number of pages9
JournalZeitschrift fur Naturforschung - Section C Journal of Biosciences
Volume46
Issue number9-10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 1991

Fingerprint

Phytophthora
Fungi
Pesticides
Axenic Culture
Principal component analysis
Principal Component Analysis
Enzymes
metalaxyl
Growth

Keywords

  • Acetanilide (Chloroacetamide) Pesticides
  • Acetochlor
  • Fungicide Mode of Action
  • Glutathione
  • Glutathione S-Transferase
  • Metalaxyl
  • Phytophthora

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Effects of Phenylamide Pesticides on the GSH-Conjugation System of Phytophthora spp. Fungi. / Oros, Gyula; Kőmíves, T.

In: Zeitschrift fur Naturforschung - Section C Journal of Biosciences, Vol. 46, No. 9-10, 01.10.1991, p. 866-874.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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