Effects of local and landscape scale and cattle grazing intensity on Orthoptera assemblages of the Hungarian Great Plain

Péter Batáry, Kirill Márk Orci, András Báldi, David Kleijn, Tibor Kisbenedek, Sarolta Erdos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aims of this study were to test the influence of grazing intensity, effects of local and landscape parameters, and regional effects on orthopteran assemblages. We made our investigations on extensively and intensively grazed cattle pastures in three regions of the Hungarian Great Plain. The regions differed in landscape complexity; one region was situated in a structurally simple landscape with large landscape units, one in a structurally complex landscape with marshy patches and trees in the grasslands and one in a landscape with intermediate structural complexity. In each region we had seven pairs of differently managed grasslands, which differed in grazing intensity. Grasshoppers were recorded once in July 2003 using sweepnet catches and visual and acoustic observations in two 95 m long transects at each site (84 transects in total). Botanical surveys and measurements of other local factors were also made for each transect. After samplings, we digitised the most important land-use types using aerial photographs to produce landscape scale parameters within 100 and 500 m circles around every site. Analysing the management, regional, landscape and local effects on species richness with linear mixed models, we showed only strong significant regional differences. Linear mixed models for Orthoptera abundance yielded significant regional effects and marginal management effects. However, after including local and landscape parameters in a separate model a marginal local effect was found instead of a management effect in addition to the significant regional effect. Logistic regression models of 15 species also revealed the importance of local factors, particularly the importance of grass height, which is highly dependent on grazing intensity. We conclude that management intensity has indirect effects on Orthoptera species richness and abundance. Landscape scale parameters are also important, at least for some species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-290
Number of pages11
JournalBasic and Applied Ecology
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 7 2007

Fingerprint

grazing intensity
Orthoptera
cattle
grazing
transect
species richness
grasslands
grassland
effect
plain
species diversity
grasshopper
grasshoppers
aerial photograph
photographs
acoustics
logistics
pasture
land use
pastures

Keywords

  • Grass height
  • Grasshopper
  • Grassland
  • Grazing management
  • Landscape complexity
  • Local scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Effects of local and landscape scale and cattle grazing intensity on Orthoptera assemblages of the Hungarian Great Plain. / Batáry, Péter; Orci, Kirill Márk; Báldi, András; Kleijn, David; Kisbenedek, Tibor; Erdos, Sarolta.

In: Basic and Applied Ecology, Vol. 8, No. 3, 07.05.2007, p. 280-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ad48e5bc4d364da39c0bdc35377b9c0a,
title = "Effects of local and landscape scale and cattle grazing intensity on Orthoptera assemblages of the Hungarian Great Plain",
abstract = "The aims of this study were to test the influence of grazing intensity, effects of local and landscape parameters, and regional effects on orthopteran assemblages. We made our investigations on extensively and intensively grazed cattle pastures in three regions of the Hungarian Great Plain. The regions differed in landscape complexity; one region was situated in a structurally simple landscape with large landscape units, one in a structurally complex landscape with marshy patches and trees in the grasslands and one in a landscape with intermediate structural complexity. In each region we had seven pairs of differently managed grasslands, which differed in grazing intensity. Grasshoppers were recorded once in July 2003 using sweepnet catches and visual and acoustic observations in two 95 m long transects at each site (84 transects in total). Botanical surveys and measurements of other local factors were also made for each transect. After samplings, we digitised the most important land-use types using aerial photographs to produce landscape scale parameters within 100 and 500 m circles around every site. Analysing the management, regional, landscape and local effects on species richness with linear mixed models, we showed only strong significant regional differences. Linear mixed models for Orthoptera abundance yielded significant regional effects and marginal management effects. However, after including local and landscape parameters in a separate model a marginal local effect was found instead of a management effect in addition to the significant regional effect. Logistic regression models of 15 species also revealed the importance of local factors, particularly the importance of grass height, which is highly dependent on grazing intensity. We conclude that management intensity has indirect effects on Orthoptera species richness and abundance. Landscape scale parameters are also important, at least for some species.",
keywords = "Grass height, Grasshopper, Grassland, Grazing management, Landscape complexity, Local scale",
author = "P{\'e}ter Bat{\'a}ry and Orci, {Kirill M{\'a}rk} and Andr{\'a}s B{\'a}ldi and David Kleijn and Tibor Kisbenedek and Sarolta Erdos",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.baae.2006.03.012",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "280--290",
journal = "Basic and Applied Ecology",
issn = "1439-1791",
publisher = "Urban und Fischer Verlag Jena",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of local and landscape scale and cattle grazing intensity on Orthoptera assemblages of the Hungarian Great Plain

AU - Batáry, Péter

AU - Orci, Kirill Márk

AU - Báldi, András

AU - Kleijn, David

AU - Kisbenedek, Tibor

AU - Erdos, Sarolta

PY - 2007/5/7

Y1 - 2007/5/7

N2 - The aims of this study were to test the influence of grazing intensity, effects of local and landscape parameters, and regional effects on orthopteran assemblages. We made our investigations on extensively and intensively grazed cattle pastures in three regions of the Hungarian Great Plain. The regions differed in landscape complexity; one region was situated in a structurally simple landscape with large landscape units, one in a structurally complex landscape with marshy patches and trees in the grasslands and one in a landscape with intermediate structural complexity. In each region we had seven pairs of differently managed grasslands, which differed in grazing intensity. Grasshoppers were recorded once in July 2003 using sweepnet catches and visual and acoustic observations in two 95 m long transects at each site (84 transects in total). Botanical surveys and measurements of other local factors were also made for each transect. After samplings, we digitised the most important land-use types using aerial photographs to produce landscape scale parameters within 100 and 500 m circles around every site. Analysing the management, regional, landscape and local effects on species richness with linear mixed models, we showed only strong significant regional differences. Linear mixed models for Orthoptera abundance yielded significant regional effects and marginal management effects. However, after including local and landscape parameters in a separate model a marginal local effect was found instead of a management effect in addition to the significant regional effect. Logistic regression models of 15 species also revealed the importance of local factors, particularly the importance of grass height, which is highly dependent on grazing intensity. We conclude that management intensity has indirect effects on Orthoptera species richness and abundance. Landscape scale parameters are also important, at least for some species.

AB - The aims of this study were to test the influence of grazing intensity, effects of local and landscape parameters, and regional effects on orthopteran assemblages. We made our investigations on extensively and intensively grazed cattle pastures in three regions of the Hungarian Great Plain. The regions differed in landscape complexity; one region was situated in a structurally simple landscape with large landscape units, one in a structurally complex landscape with marshy patches and trees in the grasslands and one in a landscape with intermediate structural complexity. In each region we had seven pairs of differently managed grasslands, which differed in grazing intensity. Grasshoppers were recorded once in July 2003 using sweepnet catches and visual and acoustic observations in two 95 m long transects at each site (84 transects in total). Botanical surveys and measurements of other local factors were also made for each transect. After samplings, we digitised the most important land-use types using aerial photographs to produce landscape scale parameters within 100 and 500 m circles around every site. Analysing the management, regional, landscape and local effects on species richness with linear mixed models, we showed only strong significant regional differences. Linear mixed models for Orthoptera abundance yielded significant regional effects and marginal management effects. However, after including local and landscape parameters in a separate model a marginal local effect was found instead of a management effect in addition to the significant regional effect. Logistic regression models of 15 species also revealed the importance of local factors, particularly the importance of grass height, which is highly dependent on grazing intensity. We conclude that management intensity has indirect effects on Orthoptera species richness and abundance. Landscape scale parameters are also important, at least for some species.

KW - Grass height

KW - Grasshopper

KW - Grassland

KW - Grazing management

KW - Landscape complexity

KW - Local scale

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33847356858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33847356858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.baae.2006.03.012

DO - 10.1016/j.baae.2006.03.012

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33847356858

VL - 8

SP - 280

EP - 290

JO - Basic and Applied Ecology

JF - Basic and Applied Ecology

SN - 1439-1791

IS - 3

ER -