Effects of individualized whole-body vibration on muscle flexibility and mechanical power

R. Di Giminiani, R. Manno, R. Scrimaglio, G. Sementilli, J. Tihanyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim. The first purpose of the present study was to assess acute, residual and chronic effects of whole-body vibration on hamstring and lower back flexibility through the application of an individual frequency of vibration. The second purpose was to determine whether the applied vibration intervention over time influences flexibility and reactive strength differently. Methods. Thirty-four young physically active subjects (19 female and 15 male) were randomly assigned to either a Control or a Vibration Group. Lower back and hamstring flexibility was measured using the Stand and Reach Test The reactive strength was estimated calculating the power in Drop Jump. Results. During whole-body vibration the relative change in acute flexibility for the Vibration Group (5.30±1.67 cm, 284%) reached a level of significance (P=0.038) compared to that of the Control Group (3.14±2.11 cm, 84%). Statistically significant differences in residual flexibility between the two groups were found at 6-min after the conclusion of vibration (P=0.034), at which point the Vibration Group showed the maximal relative change to pre-test (6.31±3.36 cm, 138%) versus the Control Group (3.06±1.87 cm, 20%). Chronic exposure of whole-body vibration did not produce significant changes in flexibility over time (P>0.05), whereas power in the Drop Jump performance of the Vibration Group increased significantly resulting in a benefit of 16% (P=0.019). Conclusion. The current study shows that individualized wholebody vibration without superimposing other exercises is an effective method of acutely increasing lower back and hamstring flexibility. Furthermore, the applied individualized whole-body vibration over time influences the reactive strength rather than flexibility. Vibration - Muscle strength - Exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-151
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Volume50
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

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Vibration
Muscles
Control Groups
Muscle Strength

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of individualized whole-body vibration on muscle flexibility and mechanical power. / Di Giminiani, R.; Manno, R.; Scrimaglio, R.; Sementilli, G.; Tihanyi, J.

In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, Vol. 50, No. 2, 06.2010, p. 139-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Di Giminiani, R. ; Manno, R. ; Scrimaglio, R. ; Sementilli, G. ; Tihanyi, J. / Effects of individualized whole-body vibration on muscle flexibility and mechanical power. In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness. 2010 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 139-151.
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