Effects of high atmospheric CO2 on the morphological and heading characteristics of winter wheat

Szilvia Bencze, O. Veisz, Z. Bedő

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two winter wheat varieties were grown in growth chambers under controlled environmental conditions at ambient (control) and doubled atmospheric CO 2 concentrations (375 and 750 μmol mol-1). By heading, the plants of both varieties were taller in the doubled CO2 treatment, where among all the vegetal parts the largest increase (31-67 %) was observed in the stem weight. The plants had higher aboveground biomass at high CO2 than at the ambient level, and also more spikes were found in both varieties at harvest, due to either increased tiller production with similar heading efficiency to the control, or a more modest rise in the tiller number accompanied by improved heading efficiency resulting in 19 % fewer sterile tillers. As there were no significant changes in the number of grains and the grain weight per spike at elevated CO2, the increase in the yield could only be attributed to the increase in the spike number, though in one variety it remained below the level of significance. Heading started later at elevated CO2, as the plants produced the main spike 1.5-3.5 days later than in the control. However, the plants of one variety produced the second spike much faster (2.7 days after the main spike, compared to 5.1 in the control) at high CO2, while in the other variety the subsequent spikes appeared in a similar chronological order to the ambient CO2 level. These findings imply that, despite the delaying impact of high CO 2 on the heading date, the plants might compensate by the faster production of further spikes, leading to a synchronisation of spike emergence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-240
Number of pages8
JournalCereal Research Communications
Volume32
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

heading
Triticum
winter wheat
inflorescences
Carbon Monoxide
Weights and Measures
Biomass
tillers
growth chambers
aboveground biomass
Growth
plant anatomy
environmental factors
stems

Keywords

  • Elevated CO
  • Heading date
  • Heading period
  • Winter wheat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Effects of high atmospheric CO2 on the morphological and heading characteristics of winter wheat. / Bencze, Szilvia; Veisz, O.; Bedő, Z.

In: Cereal Research Communications, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2004, p. 233-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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