Effects of Estradiol on Learned Helplessness and Associated Remodeling of Hippocampal Spine Synapses in Female Rats

T. Hajszán, Klara Szigeti-Buck, Nermin L. Sallam, Jeremy Bober, A. Párducz, Neil J. MacLusky, Csaba Leranth, Ronald S. Duman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Despite the fact that women are twice as likely to develop depression as men, our understanding of depression neurobiology in female subjects is limited. We have recently reported in male rats that development of helpless behavior is associated with a severe loss of hippocampal spine synapses, which is reversed by treatment with the antidepressant desipramine. Considering that estradiol has a hippocampal synaptogenic effect similar to those of antidepressants, the presence of estradiol during the female reproductive life might influence behavioral and synaptic responses to stress and depression. Methods: With electron microscopic stereology, we analyzed hippocampal spine synapses in association with helpless behavior in ovariectomized female rats (n = 70), under different conditions of estradiol exposure. Results: Stress induced an acute and persistent loss of hippocampal spine synapses, whereas subchronic treatment with desipramine reversed the stress-induced synaptic loss. Estradiol supplementation given either before stress or before escape testing of nonstressed animals increased the number of hippocampal spine synapses. Correlation analysis demonstrated a statistically significant negative correlation between the severity of helpless behavior and hippocampal spine synapse numbers. Conclusions: These findings suggest that hippocampal spine synapse remodeling might be a critical factor underlying learned helplessness and, possibly, the neurobiology of depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-174
Number of pages7
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 15 2010

Fingerprint

Learned Helplessness
Synapses
Estradiol
Spine
Depression
Desipramine
Neurobiology
Antidepressive Agents
Electrons
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Depression
  • desipramine
  • estrogen
  • stereology
  • stress
  • synaptic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Effects of Estradiol on Learned Helplessness and Associated Remodeling of Hippocampal Spine Synapses in Female Rats. / Hajszán, T.; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Sallam, Nermin L.; Bober, Jeremy; Párducz, A.; MacLusky, Neil J.; Leranth, Csaba; Duman, Ronald S.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 67, No. 2, 15.01.2010, p. 168-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hajszán, T. ; Szigeti-Buck, Klara ; Sallam, Nermin L. ; Bober, Jeremy ; Párducz, A. ; MacLusky, Neil J. ; Leranth, Csaba ; Duman, Ronald S. / Effects of Estradiol on Learned Helplessness and Associated Remodeling of Hippocampal Spine Synapses in Female Rats. In: Biological Psychiatry. 2010 ; Vol. 67, No. 2. pp. 168-174.
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