Effects of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on brain gene expression

K. Kitajka, Andrew J. Sinclair, Richard S. Weisinger, Harrison S. Weisinger, Michael Mathai, Anura P. Jayasooriya, John E. Halver, L. Puskás

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

227 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential structural components of the central nervous system. Their role in controlling learning and memory has been well documented. A nutrigenomic approach with high-density microarrays was used to reveal brain gene-expression changes in response to different PUFA-enriched diets in rats. In aged rats fed throughout life with PUFA-enriched diets, genes with altered expressions included transthyretin, α-synuclein, and calmodulins, which play important roles in synaptic plasticity and learning. The effect of perinatal omega-3 PUFA supply on gene expression later in life also was studied. Several genes showed similar changes in expression in rats fed omega-3-deficient diets in the perinatal period, regardless of whether they or their mothers were fed omega-3 PUFA-sufficient diets after giving birth. In this experiment, among the down-regulated genes were a kainate glutamate receptor and a DEAD-box polypeptide. Among the up-regulated genes were a chemokine-like factor, a tumor necrosis factor receptor, and cytochrome c. The possible involvement of the genes with altered expression attributable to different diets in different brain regions in young and aged rats and the possible mode of regulatory action of PUFA also are discussed. We conclude that PUFA-enriched diets lead to significant changes in expression of several genes in the central nervous tissue, and these effects appear to be mainly independent of their effects on membrane composition. The direct effects of PUFA on transcriptional modulators, the downstream developmentally and tissue-specifically activated elements might be one of the clues to understanding the beneficial effects of the omega-3 PUFA on the nervous system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10931-10936
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume101
Issue number30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 27 2004

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Gene Expression
Brain
Diet
Genes
Synucleins
Learning
Nutrigenomics
Kainic Acid Receptors
Nerve Tissue
Neuronal Plasticity
Prealbumin
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
Glutamate Receptors
Calmodulin
Cytochromes c
Chemokines
Nervous System
Central Nervous System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Effects of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on brain gene expression. / Kitajka, K.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Weisinger, Richard S.; Weisinger, Harrison S.; Mathai, Michael; Jayasooriya, Anura P.; Halver, John E.; Puskás, L.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 101, No. 30, 27.07.2004, p. 10931-10936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kitajka, K. ; Sinclair, Andrew J. ; Weisinger, Richard S. ; Weisinger, Harrison S. ; Mathai, Michael ; Jayasooriya, Anura P. ; Halver, John E. ; Puskás, L. / Effects of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on brain gene expression. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2004 ; Vol. 101, No. 30. pp. 10931-10936.
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