Effects of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on plasma amino acids and indices of protein metabolism in infants: Results from a randomized clinical trial

T. Decsi, I. Burus, B. Koletzko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aim: Previous studies in vitro and in animals in vivo found that α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) may enhance oxidative damage of essential amino acids. We investigated whether the addition of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) arachidonate (C20:4ω-6; AA) and docosahexaenoate (C22:6-ω3; DHA) in the form of egg phospholipids to infant formula affects plasma amino acid concentrations and indices of protein metabolism in term infants. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, healthy infants were fed from day 5 of life formula with or without preformed LCPUFA (n = 10 and 12, respectively). At the age of 5 days and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months, blood samples were obtained and analyzed for plasma amino acids by high-performance liquid chromatography and for plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Results: At the age of 3 months, plasma threonine concentrations were significantly lower in infants receiving dietary LCPUFA than in controls (124 ± 16 vs. 216 ± 28 μmol/l, p <0.05). Values of other plasma essential amino acids, total protein, albumin, creatinine and urea nitrogen did not differ between the two feeding groups throughout the study. At the age of 5 days, plasma phospholipid AA and DHA concentrations were inversely correlated with histidine concentrations (AA: r = -0.60, p = 0.01; DHA: r = -0.53, p <0.05). At the age of 3 months, DHA concentrations were inversely related to plasma histidine, methionine and threonine concentrations (r = -0.66, -0.62, and -0.64, respectively, p <0.05). Conclusions: The dietary LCPUFA supplementation of infant formula used in this study has no adverse effects on infant plasma amino acid concentrations and indicators of protein metabolism. Nonetheless, the apparent interaction of LCPUFA with some amino acids in formula-fed infants warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-201
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1998

Fingerprint

Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Randomized Controlled Trials
Amino Acids
Infant Formula
Proteins
Phospholipids
Essential Amino Acids
Threonine
Histidine
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Methionine
Gas Chromatography
Ovum
Urea
Albumins
Creatinine
Nitrogen
Fatty Acids
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Infant nutrition
  • Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids
  • Protein metabolism
  • Term infants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

@article{39159b03d54243bba8b93c717497c702,
title = "Effects of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on plasma amino acids and indices of protein metabolism in infants: Results from a randomized clinical trial",
abstract = "Background/Aim: Previous studies in vitro and in animals in vivo found that α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) may enhance oxidative damage of essential amino acids. We investigated whether the addition of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) arachidonate (C20:4ω-6; AA) and docosahexaenoate (C22:6-ω3; DHA) in the form of egg phospholipids to infant formula affects plasma amino acid concentrations and indices of protein metabolism in term infants. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, healthy infants were fed from day 5 of life formula with or without preformed LCPUFA (n = 10 and 12, respectively). At the age of 5 days and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months, blood samples were obtained and analyzed for plasma amino acids by high-performance liquid chromatography and for plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Results: At the age of 3 months, plasma threonine concentrations were significantly lower in infants receiving dietary LCPUFA than in controls (124 ± 16 vs. 216 ± 28 μmol/l, p <0.05). Values of other plasma essential amino acids, total protein, albumin, creatinine and urea nitrogen did not differ between the two feeding groups throughout the study. At the age of 5 days, plasma phospholipid AA and DHA concentrations were inversely correlated with histidine concentrations (AA: r = -0.60, p = 0.01; DHA: r = -0.53, p <0.05). At the age of 3 months, DHA concentrations were inversely related to plasma histidine, methionine and threonine concentrations (r = -0.66, -0.62, and -0.64, respectively, p <0.05). Conclusions: The dietary LCPUFA supplementation of infant formula used in this study has no adverse effects on infant plasma amino acid concentrations and indicators of protein metabolism. Nonetheless, the apparent interaction of LCPUFA with some amino acids in formula-fed infants warrants further investigation.",
keywords = "Amino acids, Infant nutrition, Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, Protein metabolism, Term infants",
author = "T. Decsi and I. Burus and B. Koletzko",
year = "1998",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1159/000012733",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "195--201",
journal = "Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism",
issn = "0250-6807",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on plasma amino acids and indices of protein metabolism in infants

T2 - Results from a randomized clinical trial

AU - Decsi, T.

AU - Burus, I.

AU - Koletzko, B.

PY - 1998/7

Y1 - 1998/7

N2 - Background/Aim: Previous studies in vitro and in animals in vivo found that α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) may enhance oxidative damage of essential amino acids. We investigated whether the addition of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) arachidonate (C20:4ω-6; AA) and docosahexaenoate (C22:6-ω3; DHA) in the form of egg phospholipids to infant formula affects plasma amino acid concentrations and indices of protein metabolism in term infants. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, healthy infants were fed from day 5 of life formula with or without preformed LCPUFA (n = 10 and 12, respectively). At the age of 5 days and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months, blood samples were obtained and analyzed for plasma amino acids by high-performance liquid chromatography and for plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Results: At the age of 3 months, plasma threonine concentrations were significantly lower in infants receiving dietary LCPUFA than in controls (124 ± 16 vs. 216 ± 28 μmol/l, p <0.05). Values of other plasma essential amino acids, total protein, albumin, creatinine and urea nitrogen did not differ between the two feeding groups throughout the study. At the age of 5 days, plasma phospholipid AA and DHA concentrations were inversely correlated with histidine concentrations (AA: r = -0.60, p = 0.01; DHA: r = -0.53, p <0.05). At the age of 3 months, DHA concentrations were inversely related to plasma histidine, methionine and threonine concentrations (r = -0.66, -0.62, and -0.64, respectively, p <0.05). Conclusions: The dietary LCPUFA supplementation of infant formula used in this study has no adverse effects on infant plasma amino acid concentrations and indicators of protein metabolism. Nonetheless, the apparent interaction of LCPUFA with some amino acids in formula-fed infants warrants further investigation.

AB - Background/Aim: Previous studies in vitro and in animals in vivo found that α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) may enhance oxidative damage of essential amino acids. We investigated whether the addition of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) arachidonate (C20:4ω-6; AA) and docosahexaenoate (C22:6-ω3; DHA) in the form of egg phospholipids to infant formula affects plasma amino acid concentrations and indices of protein metabolism in term infants. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, healthy infants were fed from day 5 of life formula with or without preformed LCPUFA (n = 10 and 12, respectively). At the age of 5 days and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months, blood samples were obtained and analyzed for plasma amino acids by high-performance liquid chromatography and for plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Results: At the age of 3 months, plasma threonine concentrations were significantly lower in infants receiving dietary LCPUFA than in controls (124 ± 16 vs. 216 ± 28 μmol/l, p <0.05). Values of other plasma essential amino acids, total protein, albumin, creatinine and urea nitrogen did not differ between the two feeding groups throughout the study. At the age of 5 days, plasma phospholipid AA and DHA concentrations were inversely correlated with histidine concentrations (AA: r = -0.60, p = 0.01; DHA: r = -0.53, p <0.05). At the age of 3 months, DHA concentrations were inversely related to plasma histidine, methionine and threonine concentrations (r = -0.66, -0.62, and -0.64, respectively, p <0.05). Conclusions: The dietary LCPUFA supplementation of infant formula used in this study has no adverse effects on infant plasma amino acid concentrations and indicators of protein metabolism. Nonetheless, the apparent interaction of LCPUFA with some amino acids in formula-fed infants warrants further investigation.

KW - Amino acids

KW - Infant nutrition

KW - Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids

KW - Protein metabolism

KW - Term infants

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