Effects of autogenic training on nitroglycerin-induced headaches

G. Juhász, Terezia Zsombok, X. Gonda, Nora Nagyne, Edit Modosne, G. Bagdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. - To investigate the prophylactic and acute effects of autogenic training (AT) during a nitroglycerin-induced migraine attack. Methods. - Thirty female migraineurs (without aura) and 11 controls participated in the study. Of these, 11 migraineurs and 5 controls practiced AT regularly for at least 6 months prior to and during the sublingual nitroglycerin test. Headache intensity and characteristics were recorded with a standardized method. During the nitroglycerin challenge, blood was collected for plasma cortisol determination and blood pressure and pulse rate were recorded. Results. - As a long-term preventive treatment, AT significantly decreased the mean headache frequency and intensity (P =.001) compared to the pretreatment period in the migraineurs who regularly practiced AT (n = 11). During the nitroglycerin challenge, AT successfully attenuated the nitroglycerin-induced acute decrease in blood pressure and pulse rate (P =.013; n = 16 AT subjects vs n = 25 non-AT subjects). However, it was not effective in preventing immediate headache (P =.71), did not decrease the frequency of acute migraine attacks (P =.79), and could not alleviate acute migraine pain (P =.78; n = 16 AT subjects vs n = 25 non-AT subjects). Plasma cortisol concentration significantly increased (P =.003) during the acute migraine attack (n = 22), and migraine intensity correlated with plasma cortisol elevations (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-383
Number of pages13
JournalHeadache
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

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Autogenic Training
Nitroglycerin
Headache
Migraine Disorders
Hydrocortisone
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure Determination
Acute Pain
Epilepsy
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Autogenic training
  • Cortisol
  • Headache
  • Migraine
  • Nitroglycerin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Effects of autogenic training on nitroglycerin-induced headaches. / Juhász, G.; Zsombok, Terezia; Gonda, X.; Nagyne, Nora; Modosne, Edit; Bagdy, G.

In: Headache, Vol. 47, No. 3, 03.2007, p. 371-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Juhász, G. ; Zsombok, Terezia ; Gonda, X. ; Nagyne, Nora ; Modosne, Edit ; Bagdy, G. / Effects of autogenic training on nitroglycerin-induced headaches. In: Headache. 2007 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 371-383.
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