Effects of a single dose of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on circadian patterns, motor activity and sleep in drug-naive rats and rats previously exposed to MDMA

Brigitta Balogh, Eszter Molnar, R. Jakus, Linda Quate, Henry J. Olverman, Paul A T Kelly, Sandor Kantor, G. Bagdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Rationale: Despite the well documented neurochemical actions of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), acute effects in rats previously exposed to the drug have not been extensively explored. Objective: To examine motor activity and vigilance effects of MDMA in drug-naive rats and in rats exposed to the drug 3 weeks earlier. Methods: MDMA (15 mg/ kg, IP) was administered to Dark Agouti rats. Motor activity, wakefulness, light slow wave sleep (SWS-1), deep slow wave sleep (SWS-2) and paradoxical sleep (PS), sleep and PS latencies were measured. Acrophases and amplitudes of the 24 h cycles were calculated by cosinor analysis. In parallel groups, local cerebral glucose utilization (1CMRglu) and (3H)-paroxetine binding were measured in motor areas of the brain. Results: In drug-naive rats MDMA caused marked increases in motor activity and wakefulness for at least 5-6 h. Circadian patterns of motor activity and sleep/vigilance parameters were altered up to 5 days after treatment. Despite most parameters tending to return to normal, there were still significant effects of MDMA on motor activity, wakefulness, and SWS-2 28 days later. Acute MDMA administration caused significant increases in 1CMRglu, but after 3 weeks 1CMRglu was decreased in the same brain areas. No significant change in [3H]paroxetine binding was observed in motor areas, although significant reductions were seen elsewhere (neocortex -81%). In rats exposed to MDMA 3 weeks earlier, most acute effects induced by MDMA administration were similar to those in drug-naive rats, but shorter duration of the acute effects were found in motor activity and vigilance. Conclusions: Our findings provide evidence that MDMA use can lead to long-term changes in regulation of circadian rhythms, motor activity and sleep generation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-309
Number of pages14
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume173
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2004

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N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Sleep
Motor Activity
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Wakefulness
Paroxetine
REM Sleep
Motor Cortex
Neocortex
Brain
Circadian Rhythm
Light
Glucose

Keywords

  • Acrophase
  • Circadian rhythm
  • Cosinor analysis
  • Ecstasy
  • Local cerebral glucose utilization
  • MDMA
  • Motor activity
  • PS latency
  • Serotonin transporter
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Effects of a single dose of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on circadian patterns, motor activity and sleep in drug-naive rats and rats previously exposed to MDMA. / Balogh, Brigitta; Molnar, Eszter; Jakus, R.; Quate, Linda; Olverman, Henry J.; Kelly, Paul A T; Kantor, Sandor; Bagdy, G.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 173, No. 3-4, 05.2004, p. 296-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balogh, Brigitta ; Molnar, Eszter ; Jakus, R. ; Quate, Linda ; Olverman, Henry J. ; Kelly, Paul A T ; Kantor, Sandor ; Bagdy, G. / Effects of a single dose of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on circadian patterns, motor activity and sleep in drug-naive rats and rats previously exposed to MDMA. In: Psychopharmacology. 2004 ; Vol. 173, No. 3-4. pp. 296-309.
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AU - Jakus, R.

AU - Quate, Linda

AU - Olverman, Henry J.

AU - Kelly, Paul A T

AU - Kantor, Sandor

AU - Bagdy, G.

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