Effectiveness of balance training programme in reducing the frequency of falling in established osteoporotic women

A randomized controlled trial

Ibolya Mikó, Imre Szerb, Anna Szerb, G. Poór

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of a 12-month sensomotor balance exercise programme on postural control and the frequency of falling in women with established osteoporosis. Design: Randomized controlled trial where the intervention group was assigned the 12-month Balance Training Programme and the control group did not undertake any intervention beyond regular osteoporosis treatment. Subjects: A total of 100 osteoporotic women - at least with one osteoporotic fracture - aged 65 years old and above. Main measures: Balance was assessed in static and dynamic posture both with performance-based measures of balance, such as the Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test, and with a stabilometric computerized platform. Interventions: Patients in the intervention group completed the 12-month sensomotor Balance Training Programme in an outpatient setting, guided by physical therapists, three times a week, for 30 minutes. Results: The Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test showed a statistically significant improvement of balance in the intervention group (p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Balance tests using the stabilometer also showed a statistically significant improvement in static and dynamic postural balance for osteoporotic women after the completion of the Balance Training Programme. As a consequence, the one-year exercise programme significantly decreased the number of falls in the exercise group compared with the control group. Conclusion: The Balance Training Programme significantly improved the balance parameters and reduced the number of falls in postmenopausal women who have already had at least one fracture in the past.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-224
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Accidental Falls
Randomized Controlled Trials
Education
Exercise
Osteoporosis
Postural Balance
Control Groups
Osteoporotic Fractures
Physical Therapists
Posture
Outpatients

Keywords

  • balance training programme
  • Established osteoporosis
  • prevention of falls
  • stabilometer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effectiveness of balance training programme in reducing the frequency of falling in established osteoporotic women : A randomized controlled trial. / Mikó, Ibolya; Szerb, Imre; Szerb, Anna; Poór, G.

In: Clinical Rehabilitation, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2017, p. 217-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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