Autológ ossejt-transzplantációt követoen kialakult plazmasejtes leukémia hatékony kezelése PAD - (bortezomib, doxorubicin, dexamethason) protokoll alkalmazásásval

Translated title of the contribution: Effective PAD (bortezomib, doxorubicine, dexamethasone) treatment of a patient with plasma cell leukaemia developed after autologous stem cell transplantation

Béla Telek, Leonóra Méhes, Péter Batár, Attila Kiss, Miklós Udvardy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The most agressive and rare manifestation of multiple myeloma is plasma cell leukaemia (PCL). While secondary form of PCL represents those heavily pretreated cases when leukaemic transformation developes terminally after intensive chemotherapy in patients with multiple myeloma, primary cases are characterized by leukaemic symptoms present at diagnosis. The secondary form has a rapid progression. The management of PCL is still unsolved. The authors present a case of a patient with non-secretory multiple mycloma who had developed plasma cell leukaemia after peripheral stem cell transplantation. PAD (bortezomib, doxorubicine, dexamethasone) treatment resulted in complete remission and 9-month survival of the patient. Previous case reports in the literature and our experience have revealed PAD protocol to be well tolerated and effective in PCL. Combination of PAD treatment with autologous and/or allogenic stem cell transplantation might further improve patients' outcome.

Translated title of the contributionEffective PAD (bortezomib, doxorubicine, dexamethasone) treatment of a patient with plasma cell leukaemia developed after autologous stem cell transplantation
Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1957-1959
Number of pages3
JournalOrvosi hetilap
Volume149
Issue number41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 12 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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