Vágóhídi komposztok és húsliszt hatása karbonátos homoktalajra

Translated title of the contribution: Effect of slaughterhouse composts and meat meal on a calcareous sandy soil

I. Kádár, Péter Ragályi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effect of various qualities of compost and meat meal on soil properties and analytical parameters was examined on a calcareous sandy soil at the Arbottyán experimental station of the Institute for Soil Sciences and Agricultural Chemistry (CAR HAS). The heterogeneous soil contained 0-8% CaCO3 and 1.0-1.5% humus. The humus layer had a thickness of 60-80 cm, with a pH(H2O) of 6.8-7.5, or pH(KCl) of 6.3-7.3. The clay fraction amounted to 10-15%. The soil was moderately supplied with phosphorus and poorly with nitrogen and potassium. The experiments were set up in a random block design in 2002 and 2003, each with five treatments (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 t•ha-1 fresh compost or 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 t•ha -1 meat meal, applied on a single occasion in the first year) in four replications, giving a total of 20 plots, measuring 5×8 = 40 m2. In later years the carry-over effects of the composts and meat meal were recorded. The maximum rates of compost (200 t•ha-1) and bony meat meal (20 t•ha-1) represented the addition to the soil of 20-120 t•ha-1 dry matter, 12-48 t•ha-1 organic matter and 0.6-6.8 t•ha-1 fat. The maximum quantity of minerals was 13.5 t•ha-1 Ca (33.7 t•ha-1 CaCO3) and 11.6 t•ha-1 P (26.6 t•ha-1 P 2O5). The quantities of K, Mg, Na and S applied also amounted to several hundred kg•ha-1 in the case of the composts, while maximum quantities (kg•ha-1) of 42 for Zn, 21 for Mn, 18 for Sr, 12 for Ba, 8 for Cu and 2 for Cr were recorded. The unmatured compost contained 275 kg•ha-1 NH4-N and the semi-matured 113 kg•ha-1. In the case of mature compost, however, a maximum mineral fertilizer equivalent of 193 kg•ha-1 NO3-N was ploughed into the soil. The effect of mature slaughterhouse compost in increasing the humus, total N, P and S and soluble P, S, Fe, Zn and Mo contents of the ploughed layer could still be detected after six years. Almost half the organic matter applied and 18-20% of the total N had been incorporated into the permanent humus reserves of the soil. The addition of un-matured compost also resulted in a significant increase in the organic matter and the total N, NO3-N, P, S and Na content of the topsoil. Among the soluble elements, the accumulation of P, K, Na, S, Zn and Cu was observed in various years. In response to the application of semi-matured compost there was a 50% increase in the organic matter content of the topsoil, while the total N content was more than doubled. The favourable effect on the soil structure was still significant in the 6th year, as was the increase in the total and soluble P, S, Na and Zn contents. At increasing rates of bony meat meal application, there was a temporary reduction of 0.5 in the pH(H2O) and a rise in the total salts, total N and mineral N fractions. The extent and rate of acid-producing nitrification is demonstrated by the 13 times increase in the NO3-N content and 6 times increase in the NH4-N concentration in the ploughed layer in the 1st year. A maximum of around 400 kg NO3-N and 165 kg NH4-N per hectare became available to the crops. In the dry year of 2003 the poor yield achieved by maize was unable to make use of the plentiful supplies of mineral N, which was probably leached to lower soil layers. By the 6th year the meat meal had decomposed and the mobile decomposition products (NO3-N, water-soluble salts, acids) had disappeared. In summary it can be stated that as meat meal is a rapidly decomposing form of manure, care must be taken not to exceed the maximum permitted rate of 170 kg•ha-1•year-1 N application on NO3-sensitive areas. Unmatured and semi-matured compost, on the other hand, mineralise slowly in the soil over a period of several years, and part of the nitrogen content becomes permanently incorporated into the humus matter in the soil. For this reason, it is unnecessary to limit the application of these types of manure to 170 kg•ha -1•year-1 N. Two or three times this amount can be safely applied.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)363-380
Number of pages18
JournalAgrokemia es Talajtan
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

meat meal
calcareous soil
calcareous soils
meat
slaughterhouses
sandy soil
sandy soils
compost
composts
humus
soil
soil organic matter
organic matter
minerals
mineral
topsoil
animal manures
manure
slaughterhouse
effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Vágóhídi komposztok és húsliszt hatása karbonátos homoktalajra. / Kádár, I.; Ragályi, Péter.

In: Agrokemia es Talajtan, Vol. 61, No. 2, 01.12.2012, p. 363-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The effect of various qualities of compost and meat meal on soil properties and analytical parameters was examined on a calcareous sandy soil at the Arbotty{\'a}n experimental station of the Institute for Soil Sciences and Agricultural Chemistry (CAR HAS). The heterogeneous soil contained 0-8{\%} CaCO3 and 1.0-1.5{\%} humus. The humus layer had a thickness of 60-80 cm, with a pH(H2O) of 6.8-7.5, or pH(KCl) of 6.3-7.3. The clay fraction amounted to 10-15{\%}. The soil was moderately supplied with phosphorus and poorly with nitrogen and potassium. The experiments were set up in a random block design in 2002 and 2003, each with five treatments (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 t•ha-1 fresh compost or 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 t•ha -1 meat meal, applied on a single occasion in the first year) in four replications, giving a total of 20 plots, measuring 5×8 = 40 m2. In later years the carry-over effects of the composts and meat meal were recorded. The maximum rates of compost (200 t•ha-1) and bony meat meal (20 t•ha-1) represented the addition to the soil of 20-120 t•ha-1 dry matter, 12-48 t•ha-1 organic matter and 0.6-6.8 t•ha-1 fat. The maximum quantity of minerals was 13.5 t•ha-1 Ca (33.7 t•ha-1 CaCO3) and 11.6 t•ha-1 P (26.6 t•ha-1 P 2O5). The quantities of K, Mg, Na and S applied also amounted to several hundred kg•ha-1 in the case of the composts, while maximum quantities (kg•ha-1) of 42 for Zn, 21 for Mn, 18 for Sr, 12 for Ba, 8 for Cu and 2 for Cr were recorded. The unmatured compost contained 275 kg•ha-1 NH4-N and the semi-matured 113 kg•ha-1. In the case of mature compost, however, a maximum mineral fertilizer equivalent of 193 kg•ha-1 NO3-N was ploughed into the soil. The effect of mature slaughterhouse compost in increasing the humus, total N, P and S and soluble P, S, Fe, Zn and Mo contents of the ploughed layer could still be detected after six years. Almost half the organic matter applied and 18-20{\%} of the total N had been incorporated into the permanent humus reserves of the soil. The addition of un-matured compost also resulted in a significant increase in the organic matter and the total N, NO3-N, P, S and Na content of the topsoil. Among the soluble elements, the accumulation of P, K, Na, S, Zn and Cu was observed in various years. In response to the application of semi-matured compost there was a 50{\%} increase in the organic matter content of the topsoil, while the total N content was more than doubled. The favourable effect on the soil structure was still significant in the 6th year, as was the increase in the total and soluble P, S, Na and Zn contents. At increasing rates of bony meat meal application, there was a temporary reduction of 0.5 in the pH(H2O) and a rise in the total salts, total N and mineral N fractions. The extent and rate of acid-producing nitrification is demonstrated by the 13 times increase in the NO3-N content and 6 times increase in the NH4-N concentration in the ploughed layer in the 1st year. A maximum of around 400 kg NO3-N and 165 kg NH4-N per hectare became available to the crops. In the dry year of 2003 the poor yield achieved by maize was unable to make use of the plentiful supplies of mineral N, which was probably leached to lower soil layers. By the 6th year the meat meal had decomposed and the mobile decomposition products (NO3-N, water-soluble salts, acids) had disappeared. In summary it can be stated that as meat meal is a rapidly decomposing form of manure, care must be taken not to exceed the maximum permitted rate of 170 kg•ha-1•year-1 N application on NO3-sensitive areas. Unmatured and semi-matured compost, on the other hand, mineralise slowly in the soil over a period of several years, and part of the nitrogen content becomes permanently incorporated into the humus matter in the soil. For this reason, it is unnecessary to limit the application of these types of manure to 170 kg•ha -1•year-1 N. Two or three times this amount can be safely applied.",
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N2 - The effect of various qualities of compost and meat meal on soil properties and analytical parameters was examined on a calcareous sandy soil at the Arbottyán experimental station of the Institute for Soil Sciences and Agricultural Chemistry (CAR HAS). The heterogeneous soil contained 0-8% CaCO3 and 1.0-1.5% humus. The humus layer had a thickness of 60-80 cm, with a pH(H2O) of 6.8-7.5, or pH(KCl) of 6.3-7.3. The clay fraction amounted to 10-15%. The soil was moderately supplied with phosphorus and poorly with nitrogen and potassium. The experiments were set up in a random block design in 2002 and 2003, each with five treatments (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 t•ha-1 fresh compost or 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 t•ha -1 meat meal, applied on a single occasion in the first year) in four replications, giving a total of 20 plots, measuring 5×8 = 40 m2. In later years the carry-over effects of the composts and meat meal were recorded. The maximum rates of compost (200 t•ha-1) and bony meat meal (20 t•ha-1) represented the addition to the soil of 20-120 t•ha-1 dry matter, 12-48 t•ha-1 organic matter and 0.6-6.8 t•ha-1 fat. The maximum quantity of minerals was 13.5 t•ha-1 Ca (33.7 t•ha-1 CaCO3) and 11.6 t•ha-1 P (26.6 t•ha-1 P 2O5). The quantities of K, Mg, Na and S applied also amounted to several hundred kg•ha-1 in the case of the composts, while maximum quantities (kg•ha-1) of 42 for Zn, 21 for Mn, 18 for Sr, 12 for Ba, 8 for Cu and 2 for Cr were recorded. The unmatured compost contained 275 kg•ha-1 NH4-N and the semi-matured 113 kg•ha-1. In the case of mature compost, however, a maximum mineral fertilizer equivalent of 193 kg•ha-1 NO3-N was ploughed into the soil. The effect of mature slaughterhouse compost in increasing the humus, total N, P and S and soluble P, S, Fe, Zn and Mo contents of the ploughed layer could still be detected after six years. Almost half the organic matter applied and 18-20% of the total N had been incorporated into the permanent humus reserves of the soil. The addition of un-matured compost also resulted in a significant increase in the organic matter and the total N, NO3-N, P, S and Na content of the topsoil. Among the soluble elements, the accumulation of P, K, Na, S, Zn and Cu was observed in various years. In response to the application of semi-matured compost there was a 50% increase in the organic matter content of the topsoil, while the total N content was more than doubled. The favourable effect on the soil structure was still significant in the 6th year, as was the increase in the total and soluble P, S, Na and Zn contents. At increasing rates of bony meat meal application, there was a temporary reduction of 0.5 in the pH(H2O) and a rise in the total salts, total N and mineral N fractions. The extent and rate of acid-producing nitrification is demonstrated by the 13 times increase in the NO3-N content and 6 times increase in the NH4-N concentration in the ploughed layer in the 1st year. A maximum of around 400 kg NO3-N and 165 kg NH4-N per hectare became available to the crops. In the dry year of 2003 the poor yield achieved by maize was unable to make use of the plentiful supplies of mineral N, which was probably leached to lower soil layers. By the 6th year the meat meal had decomposed and the mobile decomposition products (NO3-N, water-soluble salts, acids) had disappeared. In summary it can be stated that as meat meal is a rapidly decomposing form of manure, care must be taken not to exceed the maximum permitted rate of 170 kg•ha-1•year-1 N application on NO3-sensitive areas. Unmatured and semi-matured compost, on the other hand, mineralise slowly in the soil over a period of several years, and part of the nitrogen content becomes permanently incorporated into the humus matter in the soil. For this reason, it is unnecessary to limit the application of these types of manure to 170 kg•ha -1•year-1 N. Two or three times this amount can be safely applied.

AB - The effect of various qualities of compost and meat meal on soil properties and analytical parameters was examined on a calcareous sandy soil at the Arbottyán experimental station of the Institute for Soil Sciences and Agricultural Chemistry (CAR HAS). The heterogeneous soil contained 0-8% CaCO3 and 1.0-1.5% humus. The humus layer had a thickness of 60-80 cm, with a pH(H2O) of 6.8-7.5, or pH(KCl) of 6.3-7.3. The clay fraction amounted to 10-15%. The soil was moderately supplied with phosphorus and poorly with nitrogen and potassium. The experiments were set up in a random block design in 2002 and 2003, each with five treatments (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 t•ha-1 fresh compost or 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 t•ha -1 meat meal, applied on a single occasion in the first year) in four replications, giving a total of 20 plots, measuring 5×8 = 40 m2. In later years the carry-over effects of the composts and meat meal were recorded. The maximum rates of compost (200 t•ha-1) and bony meat meal (20 t•ha-1) represented the addition to the soil of 20-120 t•ha-1 dry matter, 12-48 t•ha-1 organic matter and 0.6-6.8 t•ha-1 fat. The maximum quantity of minerals was 13.5 t•ha-1 Ca (33.7 t•ha-1 CaCO3) and 11.6 t•ha-1 P (26.6 t•ha-1 P 2O5). The quantities of K, Mg, Na and S applied also amounted to several hundred kg•ha-1 in the case of the composts, while maximum quantities (kg•ha-1) of 42 for Zn, 21 for Mn, 18 for Sr, 12 for Ba, 8 for Cu and 2 for Cr were recorded. The unmatured compost contained 275 kg•ha-1 NH4-N and the semi-matured 113 kg•ha-1. In the case of mature compost, however, a maximum mineral fertilizer equivalent of 193 kg•ha-1 NO3-N was ploughed into the soil. The effect of mature slaughterhouse compost in increasing the humus, total N, P and S and soluble P, S, Fe, Zn and Mo contents of the ploughed layer could still be detected after six years. Almost half the organic matter applied and 18-20% of the total N had been incorporated into the permanent humus reserves of the soil. The addition of un-matured compost also resulted in a significant increase in the organic matter and the total N, NO3-N, P, S and Na content of the topsoil. Among the soluble elements, the accumulation of P, K, Na, S, Zn and Cu was observed in various years. In response to the application of semi-matured compost there was a 50% increase in the organic matter content of the topsoil, while the total N content was more than doubled. The favourable effect on the soil structure was still significant in the 6th year, as was the increase in the total and soluble P, S, Na and Zn contents. At increasing rates of bony meat meal application, there was a temporary reduction of 0.5 in the pH(H2O) and a rise in the total salts, total N and mineral N fractions. The extent and rate of acid-producing nitrification is demonstrated by the 13 times increase in the NO3-N content and 6 times increase in the NH4-N concentration in the ploughed layer in the 1st year. A maximum of around 400 kg NO3-N and 165 kg NH4-N per hectare became available to the crops. In the dry year of 2003 the poor yield achieved by maize was unable to make use of the plentiful supplies of mineral N, which was probably leached to lower soil layers. By the 6th year the meat meal had decomposed and the mobile decomposition products (NO3-N, water-soluble salts, acids) had disappeared. In summary it can be stated that as meat meal is a rapidly decomposing form of manure, care must be taken not to exceed the maximum permitted rate of 170 kg•ha-1•year-1 N application on NO3-sensitive areas. Unmatured and semi-matured compost, on the other hand, mineralise slowly in the soil over a period of several years, and part of the nitrogen content becomes permanently incorporated into the humus matter in the soil. For this reason, it is unnecessary to limit the application of these types of manure to 170 kg•ha -1•year-1 N. Two or three times this amount can be safely applied.

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