Effect of pre-soaking whole pelagic fish in a plant extract on sensory and biochemical changes during subsequent frozen storage

A. Lugasi, V. Losada, J. Hóvári, V. Lebovics, I. Jakóczi, S. Aubourg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plant extract treatments have largely shown a positive effect on inhibiting the quality loss during the frozen storage of minced and filleted fish products. In the present case, the effect of a plant extract on a whole fish product was checked. For it, whole fresh horse mackerel was soaked in a commercial extract solution during 60 min and then kept frozen up to 12 months at -20 °C. Sampling was carried out on the initial material and at months 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12. Two parallel experiments consisting on untreated fish (Blank Control) and water treated fish (Water Control) were carried out in the same conditions. Lipid damage was measured by lipolysis development (free fatty acid formation), rancidity development (conjugated dienes (CDs), secondary oxidation compounds, fluorescent compounds and cholesterol oxides) and sensory (odour, firmness and colour) analyses. As a result of the previous plant extract treatment, better odour and colour scores were obtained that led to a larger shelf-life time (7 months) than in the two controls (5 months), according to the sensory analysis. Water treatment of fish (Water Control) also showed some better results in sensory (odour and colour) analysis than the Blank Control, that could be related to the elimination of some prooxidant molecules included in fish. Some biochemical indices (CDs and free fatty acids) also provided a damage inhibition (P <0.05) in the 9-12 months period as a result of the plant treatment and water treatment; however, fluorescence and cholesterol oxide detections did not show differences (P > 0.05) when compared to the Blank Control. The present experiment provides promising results for soaking a pelagic whole fish in an aqueous plant extract as a previous step to its commercialization as a frozen product.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)930-936
Number of pages7
JournalLWT - Food Science and Technology
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Fingerprint

presoaking
Plant extracts
pelagic fish
Plant Extracts
frozen storage
plant extracts
Fish
Fishes
Fish Products
Fish products
Odors
fish
fish products
Color
Water Purification
odors
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
free fatty acids
color
Fatty acids

Keywords

  • Frozen storage
  • Horse mackerel
  • Plant extract
  • Rancidity
  • Whole fish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Effect of pre-soaking whole pelagic fish in a plant extract on sensory and biochemical changes during subsequent frozen storage. / Lugasi, A.; Losada, V.; Hóvári, J.; Lebovics, V.; Jakóczi, I.; Aubourg, S.

In: LWT - Food Science and Technology, Vol. 40, No. 5, 06.2007, p. 930-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e24f922c88544e07b2bfbe9af0e0f8e9,
title = "Effect of pre-soaking whole pelagic fish in a plant extract on sensory and biochemical changes during subsequent frozen storage",
abstract = "Plant extract treatments have largely shown a positive effect on inhibiting the quality loss during the frozen storage of minced and filleted fish products. In the present case, the effect of a plant extract on a whole fish product was checked. For it, whole fresh horse mackerel was soaked in a commercial extract solution during 60 min and then kept frozen up to 12 months at -20 °C. Sampling was carried out on the initial material and at months 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12. Two parallel experiments consisting on untreated fish (Blank Control) and water treated fish (Water Control) were carried out in the same conditions. Lipid damage was measured by lipolysis development (free fatty acid formation), rancidity development (conjugated dienes (CDs), secondary oxidation compounds, fluorescent compounds and cholesterol oxides) and sensory (odour, firmness and colour) analyses. As a result of the previous plant extract treatment, better odour and colour scores were obtained that led to a larger shelf-life time (7 months) than in the two controls (5 months), according to the sensory analysis. Water treatment of fish (Water Control) also showed some better results in sensory (odour and colour) analysis than the Blank Control, that could be related to the elimination of some prooxidant molecules included in fish. Some biochemical indices (CDs and free fatty acids) also provided a damage inhibition (P <0.05) in the 9-12 months period as a result of the plant treatment and water treatment; however, fluorescence and cholesterol oxide detections did not show differences (P > 0.05) when compared to the Blank Control. The present experiment provides promising results for soaking a pelagic whole fish in an aqueous plant extract as a previous step to its commercialization as a frozen product.",
keywords = "Frozen storage, Horse mackerel, Plant extract, Rancidity, Whole fish",
author = "A. Lugasi and V. Losada and J. H{\'o}v{\'a}ri and V. Lebovics and I. Jak{\'o}czi and S. Aubourg",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.lwt.2005.09.021",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "930--936",
journal = "LWT - Food Science and Technology",
issn = "0023-6438",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of pre-soaking whole pelagic fish in a plant extract on sensory and biochemical changes during subsequent frozen storage

AU - Lugasi, A.

AU - Losada, V.

AU - Hóvári, J.

AU - Lebovics, V.

AU - Jakóczi, I.

AU - Aubourg, S.

PY - 2007/6

Y1 - 2007/6

N2 - Plant extract treatments have largely shown a positive effect on inhibiting the quality loss during the frozen storage of minced and filleted fish products. In the present case, the effect of a plant extract on a whole fish product was checked. For it, whole fresh horse mackerel was soaked in a commercial extract solution during 60 min and then kept frozen up to 12 months at -20 °C. Sampling was carried out on the initial material and at months 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12. Two parallel experiments consisting on untreated fish (Blank Control) and water treated fish (Water Control) were carried out in the same conditions. Lipid damage was measured by lipolysis development (free fatty acid formation), rancidity development (conjugated dienes (CDs), secondary oxidation compounds, fluorescent compounds and cholesterol oxides) and sensory (odour, firmness and colour) analyses. As a result of the previous plant extract treatment, better odour and colour scores were obtained that led to a larger shelf-life time (7 months) than in the two controls (5 months), according to the sensory analysis. Water treatment of fish (Water Control) also showed some better results in sensory (odour and colour) analysis than the Blank Control, that could be related to the elimination of some prooxidant molecules included in fish. Some biochemical indices (CDs and free fatty acids) also provided a damage inhibition (P <0.05) in the 9-12 months period as a result of the plant treatment and water treatment; however, fluorescence and cholesterol oxide detections did not show differences (P > 0.05) when compared to the Blank Control. The present experiment provides promising results for soaking a pelagic whole fish in an aqueous plant extract as a previous step to its commercialization as a frozen product.

AB - Plant extract treatments have largely shown a positive effect on inhibiting the quality loss during the frozen storage of minced and filleted fish products. In the present case, the effect of a plant extract on a whole fish product was checked. For it, whole fresh horse mackerel was soaked in a commercial extract solution during 60 min and then kept frozen up to 12 months at -20 °C. Sampling was carried out on the initial material and at months 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12. Two parallel experiments consisting on untreated fish (Blank Control) and water treated fish (Water Control) were carried out in the same conditions. Lipid damage was measured by lipolysis development (free fatty acid formation), rancidity development (conjugated dienes (CDs), secondary oxidation compounds, fluorescent compounds and cholesterol oxides) and sensory (odour, firmness and colour) analyses. As a result of the previous plant extract treatment, better odour and colour scores were obtained that led to a larger shelf-life time (7 months) than in the two controls (5 months), according to the sensory analysis. Water treatment of fish (Water Control) also showed some better results in sensory (odour and colour) analysis than the Blank Control, that could be related to the elimination of some prooxidant molecules included in fish. Some biochemical indices (CDs and free fatty acids) also provided a damage inhibition (P <0.05) in the 9-12 months period as a result of the plant treatment and water treatment; however, fluorescence and cholesterol oxide detections did not show differences (P > 0.05) when compared to the Blank Control. The present experiment provides promising results for soaking a pelagic whole fish in an aqueous plant extract as a previous step to its commercialization as a frozen product.

KW - Frozen storage

KW - Horse mackerel

KW - Plant extract

KW - Rancidity

KW - Whole fish

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33847182820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33847182820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.lwt.2005.09.021

DO - 10.1016/j.lwt.2005.09.021

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33847182820

VL - 40

SP - 930

EP - 936

JO - LWT - Food Science and Technology

JF - LWT - Food Science and Technology

SN - 0023-6438

IS - 5

ER -