Effect of patient positioning on the evaluation of myocardial perfusion SPECT

Bertalan Kracskó, Sándor Barna, Orsolya Sántha, Anett Kiss, J. Varga, Attila Forgács, Ildikó Garai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: ECG-gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging is usually acquired in supine position. However, some patients are not comfortable in this position for a variety of personal or medical reasons. Our aim was to investigate the effect of patient positioning on quantitative SPECT imaging results using normal supine database. Methods: 55 patients (mean age 58.5 ± 8.3 years) were enrolled in this prospective study. Each patient had a pair of ECG-gated stress SPECT myocardial perfusion images acquired on two gamma cameras: one in supine position and the other in upright sitting position. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic (ED), and end-systolic (ES) left ventricular volumes (V), LV mass, summed stress perfusion defect score (SSS), and total severity score (TSS) were calculated automatically relative to a supine normal reference database. Results: There were no significant differences in LVEF using the two cameras (0.65 ± 0.08 vs. 0.66 ± 0.10; P > 0.1). However, EDV, ESV, and LV mass were significantly smaller in sitting position than in supine position (89 vs. 80 ml; 33 vs. 29 ml and 115 vs. 109 ml, respectively, all P < 0.0001). On the other hand, SSS and TSS were significantly higher in sitting position than in supine position (5.16 vs. 8.73 and 166.82 vs. 288.27, both P < 0.0001). Overall, more studies in sitting position were interpreted as abnormal than in supine position (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Patient positioning has a significant impact on quantitative gated SPECT imaging results. Using a supine normal reference database, SSS and TSS were larger in sitting position than in supine position. Thus, for imaging in sitting position, separate normal limits are required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Nuclear Cardiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Mar 30 2017

Fingerprint

Patient Positioning
Supine Position
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Posture
Perfusion
Databases
Stroke Volume
Electrocardiography
Gamma Cameras
Myocardial Perfusion Imaging
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • ECG-gated SPECT
  • Myocardial perfusion imaging
  • patient positioning
  • sitting vs. supine position

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effect of patient positioning on the evaluation of myocardial perfusion SPECT. / Kracskó, Bertalan; Barna, Sándor; Sántha, Orsolya; Kiss, Anett; Varga, J.; Forgács, Attila; Garai, Ildikó.

In: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, 30.03.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kracskó, Bertalan ; Barna, Sándor ; Sántha, Orsolya ; Kiss, Anett ; Varga, J. ; Forgács, Attila ; Garai, Ildikó. / Effect of patient positioning on the evaluation of myocardial perfusion SPECT. In: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. 2017 ; pp. 1-10.
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