Effect of low-dose dopamine infusion on urinary prostaglandin E2 excretion in sick, preterm infants

I. Seri, J. Hajdú, J. Kiszel, T. Tulassay, A. Aperia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In pharmacological doses dopamine (DA) will interact with several endocrine systems and both inhibit (prolactin, thyrotropin) and enhance (renin, angiotensin) hormonal release. In this study we have examined whether DA given to preterm neonates will influence prostaglandin (PG) production. The question is of importance since vasodilatator PGs play a role in postnatal adaptation. We determined the effect of low dose DA infusion on the 24 h urinary PGE2 excretion rate (an index of renal PGE2 synthesis) in preterm infants. Six preterm neonates, with a 24-h requirement of 2 μg/kg per min DA treatment for oedema, moderate oliguria, poor peripheral perfusion and/or mild systemic hypotension were studied on days 2 (Day 1), 3 (Day 2, the day of DA infusion), and 4 (Day 3, DA discontinued) of life. Six preterm infants (control group) that did not require DA infusion were also studied to monitor possible spontaneous changes in the renal PGE2 production on days 2, 3 and 4 of life. In the control group urine output (Uv) and PGE2 excretion rate remained unchanged during the study. In the study group DA administration resulted in nearly two-fold increases in both the Uv (194%) and PGE2 excretion (182%). Urinary PGE2 excretion was, however, closely related to urine flow in both the control infants (Day 1-3) and the study group infants (Day 1-2). Since increased diuresis stimulates renal PGE2 production, our data suggest that the increased PGE2 excretion on Day 2 in the study group was not due to a direct effect of DA on PGE2 synthesis. On Day 3, however, urinary PGE2 excretion in the study group decreased out of proportion to that of the Uv (-66% vs-23%), indicating that discontinuation of the drug infusion directly decreases renal PGE2 synthesis. In conclusion, the findings of the present study indicate that low dose DA does not directly trigger renal PGE2 production in the sick preterm infant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)616-620
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume147
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1988

Fingerprint

Dinoprostone
Premature Infants
Dopamine
Kidney
Urine
Newborn Infant
Oliguria
Control Groups
Endocrine System
Diuresis
Angiotensins
Thyrotropin
Renin
Prolactin
Hypotension
Prostaglandins
Edema
Perfusion
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Dopamine
  • Preterm infant
  • Urinary prostaglandin excretion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Effect of low-dose dopamine infusion on urinary prostaglandin E2 excretion in sick, preterm infants. / Seri, I.; Hajdú, J.; Kiszel, J.; Tulassay, T.; Aperia, A.

In: European Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 147, No. 6, 08.1988, p. 616-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "In pharmacological doses dopamine (DA) will interact with several endocrine systems and both inhibit (prolactin, thyrotropin) and enhance (renin, angiotensin) hormonal release. In this study we have examined whether DA given to preterm neonates will influence prostaglandin (PG) production. The question is of importance since vasodilatator PGs play a role in postnatal adaptation. We determined the effect of low dose DA infusion on the 24 h urinary PGE2 excretion rate (an index of renal PGE2 synthesis) in preterm infants. Six preterm neonates, with a 24-h requirement of 2 μg/kg per min DA treatment for oedema, moderate oliguria, poor peripheral perfusion and/or mild systemic hypotension were studied on days 2 (Day 1), 3 (Day 2, the day of DA infusion), and 4 (Day 3, DA discontinued) of life. Six preterm infants (control group) that did not require DA infusion were also studied to monitor possible spontaneous changes in the renal PGE2 production on days 2, 3 and 4 of life. In the control group urine output (Uv) and PGE2 excretion rate remained unchanged during the study. In the study group DA administration resulted in nearly two-fold increases in both the Uv (194{\%}) and PGE2 excretion (182{\%}). Urinary PGE2 excretion was, however, closely related to urine flow in both the control infants (Day 1-3) and the study group infants (Day 1-2). Since increased diuresis stimulates renal PGE2 production, our data suggest that the increased PGE2 excretion on Day 2 in the study group was not due to a direct effect of DA on PGE2 synthesis. On Day 3, however, urinary PGE2 excretion in the study group decreased out of proportion to that of the Uv (-66{\%} vs-23{\%}), indicating that discontinuation of the drug infusion directly decreases renal PGE2 synthesis. In conclusion, the findings of the present study indicate that low dose DA does not directly trigger renal PGE2 production in the sick preterm infant.",
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