Effect of level and source of vitamin E addition of a diet enriched with sunflower and linseed oils on growth and slaughter traits of rabbits

Cs Eiben, B. Végi, Gy Virág, K. Gódor-Surmann, K. Kustos, A. Maró, M. Odermatt, E. Zsédely, T. Tóth, J. Schmidt, H. Fébel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

As part of a trial to improve the fatty acid profile, vitamin E content and shelf-life of rabbit meat, this work studied the effects of level and source of vitamin E dietary addition on growth and carcass traits in NZW rabbits. A 10.6. MJ/kg digestible energy diet without added oil and with 60. mg/kg synthetic vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl-acetate) served as a control (C). Five other diets were 4% oil-enriched, i.e. with 2% sunflower and 2% linseed oils and so having slightly higher digestible energy contents (11.4. MJ/kg) than the C feed. In three oil-rich diets, only synthetic (S) vitamin E was used at 60, 150 or 300. mg/kg concentration (diet 60-S, 150-S or 300-S, respectively). In two oil-rich diets, 60. mg/kg synthetic plus 90. mg/kg or 240. mg/kg natural (N) vitamin E (a fatty acid distillate, i.e. d-α-tocopherol) were used to reach the 150. mg/kg (diet 150-SN) or 300. mg/kg (diet 300-SN) level of added vitamin E contents. In each group, 11 litters of 7 to 9 kits were studied in the pre-weaning period from 21 to 35. days and post-weaning to harvest at 84. days (n = 46-50). Litter and doe performance were poorer in the 300-SN rabbits than with lower levels of vitamin E. Compared to the C rabbits, the 35-84-day mortality was significantly higher only in the 60-S rabbits. The 84-day final weight of the 300-S and 300-SN rabbits was higher than the controls (2745 and 2733 vs 2594. g, P=0.049). The 35-84-day feed conversion of the C rabbits was poorer than any other rabbits (3.3 vs 3.0-3.1, P=0.001). Carcass traits were assessed with sub-samples of 15 rabbits per group and were differently affected by both the level and origin of added vitamin E. Chilled and reference carcass weights (P=0.001) and dressing out percentages (P=0.001) were higher in the 60-S and 150-S than in the C, 300-S and 150-SN rabbits. Considering all traits studied, the 150. mg/kg synthetic vitamin E dietary addition was best for maximising production. However, the effects on meat quality and shelf-life should also be considered to give correct practical advices. Our results confirm the importance of both the level and source of vitamin E when it is used as a dietary additive in oil-enriched diets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-205
Number of pages10
JournalLivestock Science
Volume139
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

Linseed Oil
linseed oil
sunflower oil
Vitamin E
vitamin E
slaughter
rabbits
Diet
Rabbits
Growth
diet
Oils
oils
digestible energy
Weaning
carcass characteristics
Meat
shelf life
weaning
Fatty Acids

Keywords

  • Carcass
  • Fatty acid
  • Meat
  • Nutrition
  • Rabbit
  • Tocopherol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effect of level and source of vitamin E addition of a diet enriched with sunflower and linseed oils on growth and slaughter traits of rabbits. / Eiben, Cs; Végi, B.; Virág, Gy; Gódor-Surmann, K.; Kustos, K.; Maró, A.; Odermatt, M.; Zsédely, E.; Tóth, T.; Schmidt, J.; Fébel, H.

In: Livestock Science, Vol. 139, No. 3, 08.2011, p. 196-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eiben, C, Végi, B, Virág, G, Gódor-Surmann, K, Kustos, K, Maró, A, Odermatt, M, Zsédely, E, Tóth, T, Schmidt, J & Fébel, H 2011, 'Effect of level and source of vitamin E addition of a diet enriched with sunflower and linseed oils on growth and slaughter traits of rabbits', Livestock Science, vol. 139, no. 3, pp. 196-205. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.livsci.2011.01.010
Eiben, Cs ; Végi, B. ; Virág, Gy ; Gódor-Surmann, K. ; Kustos, K. ; Maró, A. ; Odermatt, M. ; Zsédely, E. ; Tóth, T. ; Schmidt, J. ; Fébel, H. / Effect of level and source of vitamin E addition of a diet enriched with sunflower and linseed oils on growth and slaughter traits of rabbits. In: Livestock Science. 2011 ; Vol. 139, No. 3. pp. 196-205.
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AU - Virág, Gy

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