Effect of fungicide treatments and sanitation practices on brown rot blossom blight incidence, phytotoxicity, and yield for organic sour cherry production

I. Holb, G. Schnabel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Demand for organically grown fruit, including sour cherry, is rising in Europe and the United States, but the limited tools for disease management have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, management of brown rot blossom blight, caused by Monilinia laxa, was examined for organic sour cherry production in Hungary. Combinations of sanitation practices and fungicide treatments, including copper hydroxide, lime sulfur, and micronized and nonmicronized wettable sulfur, were investigated in 2 years and two cultivars. The effect of fungicide treatments on yield and phytotoxicity on spur-leaf clusters was also determined. Among fungicide treatments suitable for organic production, copper hydroxide and lime sulfur alone or in combination with micronized wettable sulfur were most effective for blossom blight control when applied twice (at closed blossom and full bloom) or three times (at closed blossom, full bloom, and petal fall) during bloom. Both treatments were not as effective as the conventional standard and caused more damage on spur-leaf clusters during wet weather conditions, but significantly increased crop yield compared with the untreated control or wettable sulfur treatments. Micronized and nonmicronized sulfur applied up to three times during bloom were equally effective, did not impact yield, were not phytotoxic, and reduced blossom blight compared with the untreated control. Sanitation (the removal of blighted twigs and mummified fruit) reduced blossom blight in both cultivars compared with nonsanitized plots when disease pressure was high. The need for an integrated approach to effectively manage blossom blight in organic sour cherry production is discussed. This is the first in-depth characterization of cultural and chemical brown rot blossom blight control options for organic sour cherry production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1164-1170
Number of pages7
JournalPlant Disease
Volume89
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005

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Prunus cerasus
sanitation
phytotoxicity
blight
fungicides
sulfur
incidence
copper hydroxide
organic production
Monilinia laxa
fruits
cultivars
Hungary
corolla
crop yield
leaves
disease control
weather

Keywords

  • Brown rot incidence
  • Érdi botermo
  • IFOAM
  • Prunus vulgaris
  • Újfehértói fürtös

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

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title = "Effect of fungicide treatments and sanitation practices on brown rot blossom blight incidence, phytotoxicity, and yield for organic sour cherry production",
abstract = "Demand for organically grown fruit, including sour cherry, is rising in Europe and the United States, but the limited tools for disease management have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, management of brown rot blossom blight, caused by Monilinia laxa, was examined for organic sour cherry production in Hungary. Combinations of sanitation practices and fungicide treatments, including copper hydroxide, lime sulfur, and micronized and nonmicronized wettable sulfur, were investigated in 2 years and two cultivars. The effect of fungicide treatments on yield and phytotoxicity on spur-leaf clusters was also determined. Among fungicide treatments suitable for organic production, copper hydroxide and lime sulfur alone or in combination with micronized wettable sulfur were most effective for blossom blight control when applied twice (at closed blossom and full bloom) or three times (at closed blossom, full bloom, and petal fall) during bloom. Both treatments were not as effective as the conventional standard and caused more damage on spur-leaf clusters during wet weather conditions, but significantly increased crop yield compared with the untreated control or wettable sulfur treatments. Micronized and nonmicronized sulfur applied up to three times during bloom were equally effective, did not impact yield, were not phytotoxic, and reduced blossom blight compared with the untreated control. Sanitation (the removal of blighted twigs and mummified fruit) reduced blossom blight in both cultivars compared with nonsanitized plots when disease pressure was high. The need for an integrated approach to effectively manage blossom blight in organic sour cherry production is discussed. This is the first in-depth characterization of cultural and chemical brown rot blossom blight control options for organic sour cherry production.",
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