Városi szennyvíziszap-terhelés hatásának vizsgálata tenyészedény-kísérletben. IV.

Translated title of the contribution: Effect of communal sewage sludge in a pot experiment. IV

I. Kádár, B. Morvai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of communal sewage sludge on the total (estimated after digestion with cc. HNO 3 +cc. H 2O 2) and NH 4 -acetate+EDTA-soluble element contents of four types of soils [acidic (Nyírlugos) and calcareous (Örbottyán) sand and acidic (Gyöngyös) and calcareous (Nagyhörcsök) clay] was examined in a pot experiment. The data of soil analysis were compared with the K, Mg, Na, Sr, Mn and S contents of the grain and straw yield of the test plant, spring barley, in order to demonstrate the concentration of these elements in the soil-plant system. For each soil, levels of 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 g sludge/kg soil were tested, in terms of air-dry matter. The maximum application level was equivalent to the ploughing in of 60 t/ha air-dry matter in the field, representing a mass ratio of approx. 2%. The 5 treatments×4 soils×4 replications gave a total of 80 pots (10-litre plastic buckets with holes in the base). The main conclusions were as follows: - Although the maximum sludge rates represented 10-14 times the authorised quantities of Zn, Cu, Cr and Cd over a 3-year period, the grain yield of spring barley was almost 5 times and the straw yield 3.5 times that of the control in the 3 rd year. No yield depression was observed. - As the heaviness of the soil increased, there was an almost 3 times increase in the original total Na and S contents estimated using the cc. HNO 3 +cc. H 2O 2 method and a 5-7 times increase in those of Mn and K. The initial NH 4 -acetate+EDTA-soluble element contents also increased with the heaviness of the soil, the concentrations being 2-4 times higher for Na and S and 15-16 times higher for K and Mn, on average, in clay soil than on acidic sand. The total soluble Mg and Sr contents both increased by an order of magnitude in calcareous soils compared with acidic sand. - The magnesium introduced into the soil with sewage sludge could only be detected as an increase in the total Mg content in acidic soils, while the whole of the added sulphur was observed as a proportionate increase in the total S content for all the soils. In this respect the added strontium caused a mean increase of around 70% and sodium of 50%. On average, the increase in the NH 4 -acetate+EDTA-soluble element fraction was equivalent to 90% of the Sr added with the sewage sludge, 50% of the Na and 20% each of the Mg and S in terms of soil balances. - The soluble K content of the potassium-rich clay soil from Gyöngyös was reduced by sewage sludge application, partly because of the dilution effect of the high mass of K-poor sludge, and partly due to the negative K balance. This soil also proved to have a very high manganese content, and the total and soluble Mn quantities dropped significantly due to the dilution induced by the large mass of sewage sludge, which was rich in organic matter and calcium. - The K% of the straw yield of spring barley decreased after sewage sludge application (with the exception of clay loam soil), and the Mn concentration also declined on acidic sand. There was no change in S or Sr and a slight rise in Mg, while the Na incorporation was tripled by the treatments, compared with the control. Sulphur was divided equally between the grain and the straw, but the latter contained 1.5-2 times more Mg and Mn, 3 times more K and 15-20 times more Na and Sr than the grain.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)91-104
Number of pages14
JournalAgrokemia es Talajtan
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

Fingerprint

sewage sludge
soil
experiment
straw
spring barley
sludge
sand
EDTA
acetates
barley
calcareous soils
clay soils
acid soils
acetate
sulfur
clay soil
dry matter
effect
air
dilution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Városi szennyvíziszap-terhelés hatásának vizsgálata tenyészedény-kísérletben. IV. / Kádár, I.; Morvai, B.

In: Agrokemia es Talajtan, Vol. 58, No. 1, 06.2009, p. 91-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The effect of communal sewage sludge on the total (estimated after digestion with cc. HNO 3 +cc. H 2O 2) and NH 4 -acetate+EDTA-soluble element contents of four types of soils [acidic (Ny{\'i}rlugos) and calcareous ({\"O}rbotty{\'a}n) sand and acidic (Gy{\"o}ngy{\"o}s) and calcareous (Nagyh{\"o}rcs{\"o}k) clay] was examined in a pot experiment. The data of soil analysis were compared with the K, Mg, Na, Sr, Mn and S contents of the grain and straw yield of the test plant, spring barley, in order to demonstrate the concentration of these elements in the soil-plant system. For each soil, levels of 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 g sludge/kg soil were tested, in terms of air-dry matter. The maximum application level was equivalent to the ploughing in of 60 t/ha air-dry matter in the field, representing a mass ratio of approx. 2{\%}. The 5 treatments×4 soils×4 replications gave a total of 80 pots (10-litre plastic buckets with holes in the base). The main conclusions were as follows: - Although the maximum sludge rates represented 10-14 times the authorised quantities of Zn, Cu, Cr and Cd over a 3-year period, the grain yield of spring barley was almost 5 times and the straw yield 3.5 times that of the control in the 3 rd year. No yield depression was observed. - As the heaviness of the soil increased, there was an almost 3 times increase in the original total Na and S contents estimated using the cc. HNO 3 +cc. H 2O 2 method and a 5-7 times increase in those of Mn and K. The initial NH 4 -acetate+EDTA-soluble element contents also increased with the heaviness of the soil, the concentrations being 2-4 times higher for Na and S and 15-16 times higher for K and Mn, on average, in clay soil than on acidic sand. The total soluble Mg and Sr contents both increased by an order of magnitude in calcareous soils compared with acidic sand. - The magnesium introduced into the soil with sewage sludge could only be detected as an increase in the total Mg content in acidic soils, while the whole of the added sulphur was observed as a proportionate increase in the total S content for all the soils. In this respect the added strontium caused a mean increase of around 70{\%} and sodium of 50{\%}. On average, the increase in the NH 4 -acetate+EDTA-soluble element fraction was equivalent to 90{\%} of the Sr added with the sewage sludge, 50{\%} of the Na and 20{\%} each of the Mg and S in terms of soil balances. - The soluble K content of the potassium-rich clay soil from Gy{\"o}ngy{\"o}s was reduced by sewage sludge application, partly because of the dilution effect of the high mass of K-poor sludge, and partly due to the negative K balance. This soil also proved to have a very high manganese content, and the total and soluble Mn quantities dropped significantly due to the dilution induced by the large mass of sewage sludge, which was rich in organic matter and calcium. - The K{\%} of the straw yield of spring barley decreased after sewage sludge application (with the exception of clay loam soil), and the Mn concentration also declined on acidic sand. There was no change in S or Sr and a slight rise in Mg, while the Na incorporation was tripled by the treatments, compared with the control. Sulphur was divided equally between the grain and the straw, but the latter contained 1.5-2 times more Mg and Mn, 3 times more K and 15-20 times more Na and Sr than the grain.",
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